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Something about Eve : a comedy of fig-leaves…
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Something about Eve : a comedy of fig-leaves (1927)

by James Branch Cabell

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» See also 11 mentions

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This is about in the crudest sense, a bok about what men will put up with, in order to get laid. Being by Cabell, there is a great deal more in it than that, and a good deal of insight into male-female relationships. ( )
1 vote DinadansFriend | Aug 2, 2014 |
A quite absurd, cyclical, repetitive, mercurial, occasionally brilliant, musing of the journey from naivety to maturity*. Cabell uses token fantasy and reworked mythologies in frivolous, if erudite, fashion. I found most of the book a chore to read and at the end a most unnecessary book.

*Maturity thought of by white, southern (American) males, with not a small bit of chivalry, complete with its inherent misogyny. ( )
  psybre | Apr 7, 2014 |
Been a very long time since I've read this, but I do remember not anticipating liking this one very much--because of the cover or the blurb?--reading it last after Jurgen, Figures of Earth, The Silver Stallion, Cream of the Jest and maybe one other Cabell book I could conjure up . . . But I ended up liking this, along with the Silver Satllion, best. These two books are what I'd recommend to anyone curious about Cabell. ( )
3 vote ehines | Sep 21, 2009 |
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» Add other authors (8 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
James Branch Cabellprimary authorall editionscalculated
Austen, JohnCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Carter, LinIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pape, Frank C.Illustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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To Ellen Glasgow - very naturally - this book which commemorates the intelligence of women
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0345020677, Paperback)

1927. Today, some recognize Cabell as one of the first contemporary writers from the South. He is also noted for his unique blending of classic myths and legends with his own imagination and is considered a pioneer of fantasy writing. The book begins: For some moments after he had materialized, and had become perceivable by human senses, the Sylvan waited. He waited, looking down at the very busy, young, red-haired fellow who sat within arm's reach at the writing-table. This boy, as yet, was so unhappily engrossed in literary composition as not to have noticed his ghostly visitant. So the Sylvan waited. See other titles by this author available from Kessinger Publishing.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:11:32 -0400)

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