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Demonolatry by Nicolas Remy
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Demonolatry (1595)

by Nicolas Remy

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It's hard to know how to rate this book, because I certainly wouldn't want anyone to think I agreed with anything inside. It is a curiosity, a remnant of the European witch trials, written 4 centuries ago by a French witchcraft judge who sent many women, and some men, to their death for an imagined crime, using evidence that no court of law would possibly accept today. This book is a rare look inside the mind of a true believer, and demonstrates just how little actual evidence was required to convict someone of a capital crime. The most frightening thing, to me, was the forward and footnotes written in 1929 that demonstrated how very close we still are to this sort of thinking. ( )
1 vote Devil_llama | Apr 9, 2011 |
A full-blooded account of witchcraft in France ( )
  GlenRalph | Jul 22, 2009 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Nicolas Remyprimary authorall editionscalculated
Ashwin, E. AllenTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Shepard, LeslieForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Summers, MontagueEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0486461378, Paperback)

First published in 1595, this extremely influential study of demonology was frequently cited at witchcraft trials. It draws upon ancient and contemporary sources to offer lurid details of satanic pacts and sexual perversity, and it presents the particulars of numerous court cases. This edition features annotations by a celebrated occult historian.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:11:23 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

In an era when the church and its people actually believed in a universal infection of heresy and sorcery, they turned to this book for guidance. Daemonolatreiae, first published in France in 1595, was the leading witchcraft handbook of its day. In addition to defining the black arts and their practitioners--making it possible to "recognize" witches--it offered civil and religious authorities directives for persecution of the accused and punishment of the condemned. This book amplified and updated Malleus Maleficarum, the 1486 opus that established trial procedures for charges of heresy and witchcraft. Its author, Nicolas Remy, was a notorious magistrate who boasted of having personally condemned and burned hundreds of witches. Remy's collection of notes, opinions, and court records features lurid details of satanic pacts and sexual perversity as well as the particulars of numerous trials. A work of tremendous historical significance, this volume is complemented by an introduction and notes by Montague Summers, a celebrated occult historian and expert on witchcraft and supernatural lore.… (more)

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