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The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million by…
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The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million (2006)

by Daniel Mendelsohn

Other authors: Matt Mendelsohn (Photographer)

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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» See also 66 mentions

English (27)  French (3)  Dutch (3)  Danish (1)  Greek (1)  All languages (35)
Showing 1-5 of 27 (next | show all)
The Lost is a very long and rich book, well worth the investment of time to read it. I'm not sure everyone would like The Lost as much as my husband and I do, but we both think it is superb and one-of-a-kind. In it, the author, a relative of a family of six who were killed by the Nazis in the Holocaust, in their little native town in Poland, represent the six million Jews who perished. Each had a specific personality and life story, and death story too, and Daniel Mendelsohn, a writer, out of curiosity, respect, and love for his grandfather, brother of the patriarch of the slaughtered family determines to find these things out and write them down. He succeeds to a large (and very moving) extent. So the book is the story of the six, and of the six million - it is a history, a multi-biography, a witness; it deals with the ups and downs of historical research, of the vagaries of language and the limitations of language, it tells of victims, survivors and unimaginable evil, it even goes back to the Bible to bring up the genesis faith stories. Really a wonderful book. ( )
  MarthaHuntley | Aug 31, 2016 |
This is a tough book to review - parts of it were as moving as anything I've read this year, but there was something about the author's style that dragged at times. The diversions into discussions of the Torah, the slightly odd foreshadowing of revelations to come and the sidetracking into stories that seemed irrelevant to me left me a bit frustrated. But in many ways it's a stunning read - the focus on the author's relatives provides something concrete that is often lost in the overarching horror of the holocaust. Some parts were almost unreadably upsetting and will haunt me for a long time. ( )
  mjlivi | Feb 2, 2016 |
I read about 1/3 of the book; it just didn't hold my interest. I've read quite a few books about the holocaust, maybe too many. So, this just didn't do it for me. Too slow in the beginng for me maybe? ( )
  Judy_Ryfinski | Jan 20, 2016 |
I read about 1/3 of the book; it just didn't hold my interest. I've read quite a few books about the holocaust, maybe too many. So, this just didn't do it for me. Too slow in the beginng for me maybe? ( )
  Judy_Ryfinski | Jan 20, 2016 |
Lee Child sums up "The Lost" better than I could:
"The words “truly great book” set a very high bar, don’t they, in the context of the last couple of centuries. Therefore I’d have to pick “The Lost,” by Daniel Mendelsohn. Nonfiction, but only incidentally. It’s a memoir, a Holocaust story, a detective story, both a rumination on and an analysis of narrative technique, a work of Old Testament and ancient Greek historiography, and a work of awful, heartbreaking, tragic suspense. A book of the decade, easily, and likely a book of the century."
Amen. ( )
  HenryKrinkle | Jul 23, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 27 (next | show all)
Mendelsohn verdient grote waardering voor zijn intensieve speurtocht en zijn pogen leven en lijden van 6 van de 6 miljoen concreet vorm te geven, maar jammer is het dat hij in zijn weergave van ontmoetingen en gesprekken de eigen persoon te veel op de voorgrond plaatst, te vaak tussen de lezer en het eigenlijke verhaal in gaat staan en zich hierbij verliest in talloze en overbodige details. Deze kritiek laat de waarde van dit boek als een aangrijpend menselijk document echter onverlet.
 

» Add other authors (14 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Daniel Mendelsohnprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Mendelsohn, MattPhotographersecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Vlek, RonaldTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Dedication
To Frances Begley and Sarah Pettit
sunt lacrimae rerum
First words
Some time ago, when I was six or seven or eight years old, it would occasionally happen that I'd walk into a room and certain people would begin to cry.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0060542993, Paperback)

Daniel Mendelsohn's The Lost is the deeply personal account of a search for one family among his larger family, the one barely spoken of, only to say they were "killed by the Nazis." Mendelsohn, even as a boy, was always the one interested in his family's history, but when he came upon a set of letters from his great uncle Schmiel, pleading for help from his American relatives as the Nazi grip on the lives of Jews in their Polish town became tighter and tighter, he set out to find what had happened to that lost family. The result is both memoir and history, an ambitious and gorgeously meditative detective story that takes him across the globe in search of the lost threads of these few almost forgotten lives.

A whole culture lies behind the story Mendelsohn tells, and a lifetime of reading as well. For our Grownup School feature, he has given us a tour of some of the books behind his own, in a list he calls 10 Great Novels of Family History, the Holocaust, New York Jewish Life (And Other Things That Helped Me Write My Book). And you can watch his own moving introduction to the book in this short video:


Watch Daniel Mendelsohn introduce The Lost: high bandwidth or low bandwidth

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:13:14 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

The author describes how his family was haunted by the disappearance of six relatives during the Holocaust and how he embarked on a determined search to find the remaining eyewitnesses to his lost ancestors' fates.

» see all 5 descriptions

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