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iWoz: Computer Geek to Cult Icon: How I…
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iWoz: Computer Geek to Cult Icon: How I Invented the Personal Computer,…

by Steve Wozniak

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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Showing 1-5 of 34 (next | show all)
Enjoyable read...particularly the engineering parts where he talked about creating his computer and figuring things out way ahead of the curve. i always appreciate economy of design and coding and it sure seems that Woz did too. And unlike Steve Jobs who had less than no redeeming qualities at all, Steve Wozniak is an actual human being who cares and it comes through in his narrative...didn't blame Jobs for his myriad flaws, though he certainly coukd have.

Hats off to the man who single-handedly designed and built the last good computer Apple ever made (that would be the Apple II)...nice story. ( )
  Razinha | May 23, 2017 |
Well, as far as a biography goes, there isn’t all that much and what there is, is only adding to the impression of a somewhat disjointed personality.

The impression this book left me was an attempt to set the record straight, which is never a good thing in a biography.

Writing-wise the book is awful. Repetition ad nauseam, boasting, etc. We don't really get to know the man behind all those achievements, that is, the universal remote control, Apple I, Apple II, Apple III (Ahem, sorry, my mistake, this one was "invented" by a committe lead by Steve Jobs, ah ah).

If you're really interested to know the Wozniak's personal take on the "invention" of the personal computer, go ahead and read it. If not, there's already a all bunch of information on the web, where the record is already straight... Stick to it. ( )
  antao | Dec 10, 2016 |
This is my first review on Goodreads. I was very lucky to win a copy of “iWoz” as part of the First Reads giveaways. I may not have read this otherwise, but I really enjoyed it and am glad I won! Perhaps my biggest impression, what I remember most, is that I learned a lot about electrical engineering and how computers are put together and function. Wozniak presents a very logical layout of the development of electronics, and how he met technological needs – often in an overnight marathon (though after writing out or printing on paper beforehand, until it was all memorized). He had the vision to anticipate what people would want to use in the future. His sense of humor is always present, though some of his pranks did not seem to be such good ideas. The dial-a-joke and other phone-related hacks were amusing, though these are probably not going to be around much longer. He is an example of what one might do when they have more money than they know what to do with, like creating a music festival from scratch, but also giving to other philanthropic causes.
The Apple I and especially the Apple II computers seemed to be his biggest accomplishment, and he explains why these were a success, while other products (like the Apple III) were not. He also tells what it was like to work for different companies (such as HP), and to start one (for making a universal remote control). His experience with anterograde amnesia was interesting, as a biological rather than technological problem. I thought he made it clear that he is very honest, yet still with human flaws, like not being able to keep a marriage together. He seems like a very good person in any case, and has used his knowledge and production for good. Now, too, the record may be set straight on a few legends surrounding Apple and the Home Brew Computer Group. This was an easy-to-follow book (at one point the reader is reminded this is a “family” book), and it is well-paced, probably thanks in large part to Gina Smith. It is always interesting to hear people tell their stories, and this gives a solid background on the foundations of much of the technology we use today. ( )
  MattCembrola | May 27, 2016 |
Not the most stunning writing, but to the point. A look into the world of the lone genius. ( )
  ndpmcIntosh | Mar 21, 2016 |
Great book.. amazed by Wozs' creative genius. good tech book :-) hope Woz pens a book on his pranks too ;-).
Wozs' great at tech level.. very inspiring. ( )
  _RSK | Jan 26, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 34 (next | show all)
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Smith, GinaContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0393061434, Hardcover)

The mastermind behind Apple sheds his low profile and steps forward to tell his story for the first time.

Before cell phones that fit in the palm of your hand and slim laptops that fit snugly into briefcases, computers were like strange, alien vending machines. They had cryptic switches, punch cards and pages of encoded output. But in 1975, a young engineering wizard named Steve Wozniak had an idea: What if you combined computer circuitry with a regular typewriter keyboard and a video screen? The result was the first true personal computer, the Apple I, a widely affordable machine that anyone could understand and figure out how to use.

Wozniak's life—before and after Apple—is a "home-brew" mix of brilliant discovery and adventure, as an engineer, a concert promoter, a fifth-grade teacher, a philanthropist, and an irrepressible prankster. From the invention of the first personal computer to the rise of Apple as an industry giant, iWoz presents a no-holds-barred, rollicking, firsthand account of the humanist inventor who ignited the computer revolution. 16 pages of illustrations.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:11:14 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

Once upon a time, computers looked like big, alien vending machines. They had large screens, cryptic switches, huge boxes, and odd lights. But in 1975, a young engineering wizard named Steve Wozniak had an idea: What if you combined computer circuitry with a regular typewriter keyboard and a video screen? The result was the first true personal computer, the Apple I. Widely affordable and easily understood, Wozniak's invention has been rapidly transforming our world ever since. His life--before and after Apple--is a "home-brew" mix of brilliant discovery and adventure, as an engineer, a concert promoter, a fifth-grade teacher, a philanthropist, and an irrepressible prankster. From the invention of the first personal computer to the rise of Apple as an industry giant, iWoz presents a no-holds-barred, rollicking, firsthand account of the humanist inventor who ignited the computer revolution.--From publisher description.… (more)

» see all 2 descriptions

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W.W. Norton

An edition of this book was published by W.W. Norton.

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Tantor Media

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