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Never Fall Down: A Novel by Patricia…
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Never Fall Down: A Novel (edition 2012)

by Patricia Mccormick

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4412723,785 (4.32)44
Member:chazzard
Title:Never Fall Down: A Novel
Authors:Patricia Mccormick
Info:Balzer & Bray (2012), Hardcover, 288 pages
Collections:Ebooks
Rating:****
Tags:cambodia, 1970s, 1980s, genocide, child soldier, war, refugees, survival, young adult, fiction, tpl, ebook

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Never Fall Down by Patricia McCormick

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» See also 44 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 27 (next | show all)
RGG: Powerful graphic memoir novel depicting an horrific period and especially its impact on children. The syntax is a bit awkward, which McCormick provides a reason for at the end. And it might have been useful for Arn's behavior at the end to have been ascribed to PTSD. Because of the depiction of the subject matter and the style of the prose, this is a read for older students. Reading Interest: 14-YA.
  rgruberhighschool | Sep 28, 2016 |
Wow! This is SUCH a powerful book. This book is the novelistion of Arn Chorn Pond's life as a child living under the brutal Kmer Rouge regime in Cambodia. Although this is a young adult novel, there is no gilding of the lily here. Events are told in the starkest light - descriptions of torture, murder, starvation, disease, fear and confusion are presented in the most authentic voice. McCormick interviewed Arn over the course of two years and has told the story in the first person, styling her prose in Cambodian English - a masterful stroke, lending authenticity to the narrative.

But why am I talking about style and narrative? This is an important story, full of the rawness of a child trying to survive in circumstances where merely making eye contact with someone can get you killed, where a handful of rice can be the difference between life and death, where a beautiful temple can be turned into a torture chamber and where an invitation to visit the mango grove can mean either that you won't be seen again or that you will have to help roll dead bodies into a mass grave.

This is a book which raises questions about the human condition and about what happens when madmen have access to unfettered political power. It's the story of Pol Pot, but it's also the story of Hitler, Amin, Kim Jong Il, Mugabe, Hussein, Sudan and the government of Guatemala during the second half of the 20th century. If this book doesn't make you angry, you are like the children in the camp - too frightened and hopeless to feel emotion when the child sitting beside you at meal time quietly dies of starvation.

But it's also a story of inspiration. One child managed to get out and as an adult has made a difference, having endured what no child should have endured.

Obviously Patricia McCormick has a highly developed social conscience, given not only this novel, but previous ones as well and I applaud her achievements in informing young people about stories that are important in our world. If such novels galvanise people to make a difference, or even to THINK about making a difference, all power to her! ( )
  mmacd3814 | May 30, 2016 |
This is an incredibly powerful and emotional book, and difficult to read. Not because of the way it is written, but because of the horrific circumstances, brutality and torture that the Cambodian people had to face under the Khmer Rouge. Based on true events, eleven year old, Arn Chorn is taken from his home, separated from his family and has to witness, and some times be involved in, tragedies that no child should have to endure. Yet, despite everything Arn manages to keep his compassion, humanity and survival skills alive. Narrated in Arn's own distinctive voice, broken English, grammatical mistakes and all (a brilliant move by the author), this is an inspirational book and one that will remain with the reader long after the last page has been read. ( )
  HeatherLINC | Jan 22, 2016 |
Brutal story based on the real life events of a young boy forced to become a child soldier for the Khmer Rouge. Very violent and disturbing. ( )
  saillergirl | Jan 18, 2016 |
RGG: Powerful graphic memoir novel depicting an horrific period and especially its impact on children. The syntax is a bit awkward, which McCormick provides a reason for at the end. And it might have been useful for Arn's behavior at the end to have been ascribed to PTSD. Because of the depiction of the subject matter and the style of the prose, this is a read for older students. Reading Interest: 14-YA.
  rgruberhighschool | Apr 10, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 27 (next | show all)
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At night in our town, it's music everywhere.
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And I know then I have power. Power from playing the khim and leading the other singer. Power from also being a dancer. Power from being a little bit a star in the show. I feel big with this power--tall, not like little kid--like right now I just stop Siv from probably dying. No one here talks back to the Khmer Rouge, no one challenge them. But maybe I can now. (end of chapter 5)
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Book description
EIN JUGENDROMAN ÜBER DIE SCHRECKENSHERRSCHAFT DER ROTEN KHMER IN KAMBODSCHA
Als Arn Chorn Pond noch ein Junge ist, übernimmt das radikale kommunistische Regime der Roten Khmer die Macht in Kambodscha. Es folgt ein schrecklicher Völkermord, dem zwei Millionen Menschen zum Opfer fallen – ein Viertel der gesamten Bevölkerung.
Arn hat überlebt. Doch der Preis dafür war hoch. Denn er ist selbst zum Täter geworden. Und es ist ihm schwer gefallen, den Tiger in seinem Herzen zu bändigen.
Schonungslos und brutal erzählt Patricia McCormick von den Killing Fields. Es braucht nachhaltig beeindruckende Bücher wie dieses, um aufzuzeigen, zu welchen Grausamkeiten Menschen fähig sind und welche Fehler sich niemals wiederholen dürfen.
VERÄNDERE DIE WELT, INDEM DU DIE WAHRHEIT SAGST!
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"Cambodian child soldier Arn Chorn-Pond defied the odds and used all of his courage and wits to survive the murderous regime of the Khmer Rouge"--

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