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Kids of Kabul: Living Bravely Through a Never-Ending War

by Deborah Ellis

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725277,368 (4.5)None
Since its publication in 2000, hundreds of thousands of children all over the world have read and loved The Breadwinner. By reading the story of eleven-year-old Parvana and her struggles living under the terror of the Taliban, young readers came to know the plight of children in Afghanistan. But what has happened to Afghanistan's children since the fall of the Taliban in 2001? In 2011, Deborah Ellis went to Kabul to find out. She interviewed children who spoke about their lives now. They are still living in a country torn apart by war. Violence and oppression still exist, particularly affecting the lives of girls, but the kids are weathering their lives with courage and optimism: "I was incredibly impressed by the sense of urgency these kids have--needing to get as much education and life experience and fun as they can, because they never know when the boom is going to be lowered on them again." The two dozen or so children featured in the book range in age from ten to seventeen. Many are girls Deb met through projects funded by Canadian Women for Women in Afghanistan (http://www.cw4wafghan.ca), the organization that is supported by royalties from The Breadwinner Trilogy. Parvana's Fund provides grants toward education projects for Afghan women and children, including schools, libraries and literacy programs.--Publisher description.… (more)

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Showing 5 of 5
If kids are the future, Afghanistan needs to step up and support them. The author interviews teens displaced by years of war, hampered by poverty and lack of education, and especially in the case of the girls, restricted by a culture that sees them as second-class. In spite of bleakness around them they express hope and desire to improve their lives and for their country to have a better future. Chapters are short and the voices compelling which makes this ideal for read-alouds and classroom discussion. ( )
  Salsabrarian | Feb 2, 2016 |
Good mix of factual background information and children's stories. ( )
  keindi | Jan 23, 2016 |
55370000442021
  Bookman1954 | Oct 21, 2015 |
This book is dedicated: "To the next generation of survivors". The children who narrate their stories (mostly girls but a few boys) are truly 'living bravely through a never-ending war' (the book's subtitle). They all seem to convey some thread of hope, despite some pretty dismal living situations. The importance of education and studying is mentioned by most. Enduring hunger and boredom are also frequent experiences among the children. Deborah Ellis gives the reader a brief background before each of the children tell their story. ( )
  geraldinefm | Dec 3, 2013 |
An outstanding collection of interviews with boys and girls ranging in age from 10 to 17 speaking candidly about living in a country still at war and in an environment where violence and oppression still exists all around them. Their lives are full of hardship and painful loss but also resiliency and hope. An important, insightful book. ( )
  Sullywriter | Apr 3, 2013 |
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Since its publication in 2000, hundreds of thousands of children all over the world have read and loved The Breadwinner. By reading the story of eleven-year-old Parvana and her struggles living under the terror of the Taliban, young readers came to know the plight of children in Afghanistan. But what has happened to Afghanistan's children since the fall of the Taliban in 2001? In 2011, Deborah Ellis went to Kabul to find out. She interviewed children who spoke about their lives now. They are still living in a country torn apart by war. Violence and oppression still exist, particularly affecting the lives of girls, but the kids are weathering their lives with courage and optimism: "I was incredibly impressed by the sense of urgency these kids have--needing to get as much education and life experience and fun as they can, because they never know when the boom is going to be lowered on them again." The two dozen or so children featured in the book range in age from ten to seventeen. Many are girls Deb met through projects funded by Canadian Women for Women in Afghanistan (http://www.cw4wafghan.ca), the organization that is supported by royalties from The Breadwinner Trilogy. Parvana's Fund provides grants toward education projects for Afghan women and children, including schools, libraries and literacy programs.--Publisher description.

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