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Do not pass go: from the Old Kent Road to Mayfair

by Tim Moore

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379850,385 (3.25)16
A book that tells the story of London since the thirties through the 28 streets, stations and utililties of the Monopoly board . In the wonderful world of Monopoly it still only cost -50 to buy a house in Islington, you can move around London with the shake of a dice and even park your car for free. IN DO NOT PASS GO Tim Moore, belying his reputation as a player who always paid that -10 fine rather than take a Chance, fearlessly tackles the real thing and along the way tells the story of a game and the city that frames it. Sampling the rags and the riches he stays in a hotel in Mayfair and one in the Old Kent Road, enjoys quality time with Dr Crippen in Pentonville Prison and even winds up at the wrong end of the Water Works pipe. And, solving all the mysteries you'll have pondered whilst languishing in jail and many other you certainly wouldn't, Tim Moore reveals how Pall Mall got its name, which three addresses you won't find in your A-Z and why the sorry cul-de-sac that is Vine Street has a special place in the heart of Britain's most successful Monopoly champion. The stirring travelogue of one man's erratic progress around those 28 stations, utilities and street, Do Not Pass Go is also an epic and lovingly researched history of London's wayward progress in the 66 years since the launch of the world's most popular board game.… (more)

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Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
This book outlines the history of the Monopoly board game takes you on a fascinating tour of London via the Monopoly board locations. It is creatively written in a lighthearted manner. It delves into interesting history behind all the M board squares. A bit crude in places, but a good entertaining read. I always thought the London based board was the original, how wrong you can be. ( )
  GeoffSC | Jul 25, 2020 |
Synopsis: Tim did not outgrow his childhood obsession with Monopoly, leading him to consider how far he could take his obsession. So, Tim goes on an adventure around London, visiting the places and streets (and even jails!) that are mentioned in the famous game of Monopoly.
My Opinion: A very informative travelogue of London. Monopoly was created in 1936, and there are often comparisons from London today to how it would have been back then. Having been to London myself, it was nice when he visited places I was familiar with. I found the writing style a little bit jumpy - obviously this is an adventure around London but sometimes it was just information overload. ( )
  Moniica | Nov 18, 2018 |
Growing up in Australia my knowledge of London was all-but restricted to the Monopoly board. Thus, I knew that Mayfair and Park Lane were out of my price range if I ever moved to London, I learnt how to pronounce "Pall Mall", I knew to avoid Old Kent Road and above all I wondered what on earth "The Angel, Islingdon" was (spoiler alert; it's a building that currently hosts a pub and bank).

If "Don't Pass Go" was around in the late seventies/early eighties it would have saved a lot of wondering on my behalf. Moore does a bang-up job filling in our knowledge of each of the Monopoly, giving context as to why a particular street or location was chosen and supplying the odd dab of self-depreciating humour to keep it rolling.

Of course, when I finally got to London a few decades after first encountering it on the Monopoly board, it didn't seem to have the same magic that the board game instilled in me. That's not Moore's fault though. ( )
1 vote MiaCulpa | Nov 23, 2015 |
Moore has a great affection for Monopoly, but very little for many of the gaucheries of modern London, or for the pomposity of Governments or Industry (including it might be added Hasbro, the modern licensee of Monopoly). What could be a dry account is enlivened not just by Moore's disinclination to suppress saying what he feels at any point in time (and a lot of it is about local UK politics and culture), but also by his boldness at inserting himself into situations that wiser cooler heads might have avoided. But having a quest does that to a person, gives them courage - and a reason - to plod on and tackle the many obstacles on his path to discovering not just the history, but also the character, of all of the locations mirrored in the UK version of the Monopoly Game board. It's painless history, and a fillip for anyone with a Monopoly obsession, but mostly it's just a well written, easy reading, guide to parts of London that you might add to your itinary if ever you're passing that way. ( )
1 vote nandadevi | Jun 26, 2015 |
Highly entertaining and suprisingly informative ride around the London of the 1930s Monopoly board. An original angle on a unique slice of London's rich and varied history. I like Moore's sense of humour. It's the kind of book you consciously start slowing down on towards the end as you don't want it to end too soon! ( )
  Polaris- | Jan 26, 2011 |
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To Lilian and Felix
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Tim Moock rushed back in from the loo and swiftly counted the pink ones in the bank tray.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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A book that tells the story of London since the thirties through the 28 streets, stations and utililties of the Monopoly board . In the wonderful world of Monopoly it still only cost -50 to buy a house in Islington, you can move around London with the shake of a dice and even park your car for free. IN DO NOT PASS GO Tim Moore, belying his reputation as a player who always paid that -10 fine rather than take a Chance, fearlessly tackles the real thing and along the way tells the story of a game and the city that frames it. Sampling the rags and the riches he stays in a hotel in Mayfair and one in the Old Kent Road, enjoys quality time with Dr Crippen in Pentonville Prison and even winds up at the wrong end of the Water Works pipe. And, solving all the mysteries you'll have pondered whilst languishing in jail and many other you certainly wouldn't, Tim Moore reveals how Pall Mall got its name, which three addresses you won't find in your A-Z and why the sorry cul-de-sac that is Vine Street has a special place in the heart of Britain's most successful Monopoly champion. The stirring travelogue of one man's erratic progress around those 28 stations, utilities and street, Do Not Pass Go is also an epic and lovingly researched history of London's wayward progress in the 66 years since the launch of the world's most popular board game.

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