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Elizabeth and Mary: Cousins, Rivals, Queens…
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Elizabeth and Mary: Cousins, Rivals, Queens (2003)

by Jane Dunn

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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» See also 27 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 18 (next | show all)
Thorough, clear and readable. ( )
  kaitanya64 | Jan 3, 2017 |
Not nearly finished but, man, what a great book, and the narrator is awesome. Read with enough pause between sentences that you can really take in and think about what was just said... excellent!!! Highly recommend, incredibly interesting story.

Now that I've finished... just confirming that this is an excellent book (audiobook). Easy to fully get into the storylines but, I will admit, the storylines get awfully convoluted, especially when a couple of women are named "Mary" and, well, forget the men, every other man is Henry or Richard etc. etc... There are some exceptions which help clarify to which story the author is referring but towards the middle and end it is sometimes confusing to determine whch person is in the story being currently told ( )
  marshapetry | Oct 9, 2016 |
From the book's Preface: "Of all the monarchs of these islands, it is Elizabeth I and Mary Queen of Scotts who most stir the imagination." While I might argue there are others who've stirred just as much imagination, there is no denying the impact of these two women on each other's lives. This book compares the lives of both, detailing the impact of their formative years on their later lives. Mary, a pampered Queen from childhood who was given to expect everything her way and later, something of a femme fatale versus Elizabeth, once a Princess, declared illegitimate, and locked in the Tower in fear of her life under threat of her sister, Mary I. It was a fascinating account, in my opinion, and I especially enjoyed the way Dunn compared each phase of their lives, using the many letters that remain to this day as her sources. ( )
  Oodles | Feb 16, 2016 |
This is a well written (sometimes boring) inclusive book about Elizabeth I and the rivalry for the English Crown against her delusional, conniving, presumptuous, arrogant, murderous, and slutty cousin Mary of Scots. There are many references & notes referring back to historical documents, which makes this piece on non-fiction more authentic.

Mary got was coming to her...Elizabeth did her best to keep Mary alive, but Mary just wouldn't give up on trying to have Elizabeth murdered! ( )
  Auntie-Nanuuq | Jan 18, 2016 |
A long read. The comparison between the two Queens/Cousins was certainly well researched and done. Just a bit to long for my taste. ( )
  JanicsEblen | Jan 14, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 18 (next | show all)
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Jane Dunnprimary authorall editionscalculated
Peters, DonadaNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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In memory of a much loved father DAVID ROLF THESEN 1923-2002 "out of the strong came forth sweetness"
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These were dangerous times.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0375708200, Paperback)

Jane Dunn’s Elizabeth and Mary: Cousins, Rivals, Queens offers a blend of history and biography that traces the "dynamic interaction" between two of the most powerful women in Western history. Dunn remains ever aware of the uniqueness of her two central figures: both women ruled as divinely ordained monarchs in a male dominated power structure; and both women were from the same family (Elizabeth I was the granddaughter of Henry VII, and Mary Queen of Scots the great-granddaughter of King Henry).

By focusing not on pure biography but instead on relationships, Dunn is able to narrow her book (still mammoth in scope) to the most salient and interesting events in the two queens’ lives. The book begins in 1558, the year in which Mary first wed and Elizabeth assumed the throne of England. Almost immediately the cousins were embroiled in a conflict that would endure for the remainder of Mary’s life. A restless, sexually-active Catholic, and leader of the Scottish people in alliance with France, Mary was ever a conduit for rumors of rebellion. The "Virgin Queen" Elizabeth used Mary as a dark reflection to underline her own celibate constancy as a ruler of law and order.

The pair never met face to face, but as Dunn reveals, their lives were closely intertwined. After holding Mary in Fotheringhay prison for nearly two decades, Elizabeth ordered her cousin executed in 1587. Mary had chosen martyrdom in favor of a confession to complicity in the Babington assassination plot. In court, she declared: "I would never make Shipwreck of my Soul by conspiring the Destruction of my dearest Sister." Though the ostensible victor, Elizabeth (who had struggled to find a way to release her cousin while still upholding her own power as queen) confessed, "I am not free, but a captive." In Elizabeth and Mary, Dunn has built a rich world that underlines the tragic struggle between private emotions and the public faces history puts on them. --Patrick O’Kelley

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:10:30 -0400)

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A dual portrait of England's Queen Elizabeth I and Mary Queen of Scots documents their complex relationship, different characteristics, and ideals, and discusses their reigns, power struggle, and influence on British history.

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