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Feeding the Monster: How Money, Smarts, and…
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Feeding the Monster: How Money, Smarts, and Nerve Took a Team to the Top

by Seth Mnookin

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162873,595 (3.89)1
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    The Extra 2%: How Wall Street Strategies Took a Major League Baseball Team from Worst to First by Jonah Keri (Anonymous user)
    Anonymous user: Both books explore the managerial dynamics and strategies of a baseball team that took more analysis-driven approaches to succeed. Emphasis in both on the aspects of finding undervalued assets and exploiting holes in the market.
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Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
How money, smarts, and nerve took the Red Sox to the 2004 World Series. ( )
  JackSweeney | Jan 9, 2017 |
Not to be confused with "Feeding the Green Monster," Rob Neyer's game-by-game journal and analysis of the 2000 Red Sox, who were interesting, but missed the playoffs. This is the story of how the Red Sox stopped repeating what didn't work before (as in 2000) and got on the road to a championship. ( )
  ehines | Oct 4, 2014 |
This long detailed look at the 21st century Red Sox focuses on front office politics and relationships as well as on Theo Epstein's success at building a winning team. I read it after attending my first game at Fenway Park, which was perhaps the most intense sporting experience I have had. Mnookin is impartial and the book is a joy to read. ( )
  nmele | Apr 6, 2013 |
I think this is a fascinating book. I am a baseball fan with no deep knowledge of the back room machinations of the Red Sox - and I couldn't put this book down. I think most avid Red Sox fans would know most of this information, but it is a wonderful summarization of the period leading into the 2007 World Series win.

Reading this book has also put me at ease, because as a Liverpool FC supporter, I am now very pleased that Henry and Werner how own the club. ( )
  ANeumann | Dec 1, 2010 |
Seth Mnookin is a joy to read, and this book combines fanboy love, cold hard facts, and good writing in a way that few books about the Red Sox have managed. ( )
  luketest4 | Jul 31, 2009 |
Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
It's both a Moneyball-style triumph of smart management over conventional wisdom and a redemptive story of athletic success as an expression of inner strength.
added by Shortride | editTime, Lev Grossman (Jul 16, 2006)
 
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0743286812, Hardcover)

When the Boston Red Sox won the World Series on October 27, 2004, they made history. Their stunning comeback against the New York Yankees and their four-game annihilation of the St. Louis Cardinals capped one of the most thrilling postseason runs ever. The World Series victory-Boston's first in 86 years-came less than three years after John Henry and Tom Werner bought the team from the Yawkey Trust and forever changed the way the Red Sox operated on and off the field.

Seth Mnookin was given access never before granted to a reporter in the history of organized sports. He had a key to Fenway Park and a desk in the team's front office. He spent weekends talking business with John Henry and afternoons in the clubhouse with Manny Ramirez and David Ortiz. He learned never-before-told details of the team's Thanksgiving Day wooing of Curt Schilling, the jealousy Nomar Garciaparra felt toward better-paid teammates, and the anxiety that impelled Pedro Martinez to insist that the Red Sox guarantee his future. He was there when general manager Theo Epstein's frustration over the organization's ceaseless drive for more media coverage and new revenue streams collided with his fracturing relationship with CEO Larry Lucchino. The resulting narrative -- juicy, gripping, and overflowing with thrilling detail -- reveals how a savvy sports organization tries to stay on top while under the relentless scrutiny of the country's most voracious sportswriters and baseball's most demanding fans.

Drawn from hundreds of hours of exclusive interviews and a year with the team, Feeding the Monster shows as no book ever has before what it means to buy, sell, run, and be part of a major league sports team in America.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:25:16 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

When the Boston Red Sox won the World Series in 2004, their stunning comeback against the New York Yankees and their four-game annihilation of the St. Louis Cardinals capped one of the most thrilling postseason runs ever. The World Series victory--Boston's first in 86 years--came less than three years after John Henry and Tom Werner bought the team and forever changed the way the Red Sox operated on and off the field. Seth Mnookin was given access never before granted to a reporter in the history of organized sports. He had a key to Fenway Park and a desk in the team's front office. The resulting narrative reveals how a savvy sports organization tries to stay on top while under the relentless scrutiny of the country's most voracious sportswriters and baseball's most demanding fans.--From publisher description.… (more)

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