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Summer at Forsaken Lake by Michael D. Beil
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Summer at Forsaken Lake

by Michael D. Beil

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Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
12 year old Nicholas Mettleson and his younger twin sisters have been sent to spend the summer in Demming, Ohio where their father spent summers growing up. It's a different world from NYC, but "Uncle Nick" - who doesn't have a tv - turns out to be a really great guy and soon he's teaching them how to sail on the lake. Nicholas makes friends with a girl named Charlie who can throw a curve ball no one can hit, learns how to ride a bike, and discovers a secret compartment with an unfinished movie called "The Seaweed Strangler" that his father was making when he was 14 years old and spending the summers there. But they soon discover other secrets - secrets some people would prefer to leave alone - and summer in a small town turns out to be anything but boring.

Although the "mystery" about their father and the seaweed strangler drives the plot along, it's really more of an old-fashioned story about growing up and spending the summer away from parents and home. It's the kind of book I loved to get lost in as an 11 or 12 year old, and always made me wish I had someplace like that to spend the summer. It doesn't go overboard and try too hard to keep kids reading with thrill-a-minute adventure, but charms with a slower and easier pace and a beautiful setting that will make kids wish to be there. The characters are all likable and act like real kids that age, like sometimes annoying each other, and dealing with issues like divorced parents. Still, it's a clean book (there might have been a couple of very mild profanities) and reminded me a little of Gary Schmidtt books, although much more low-key. My advance copy didn't have the artwork, but I looked at it online (through the "look inside" feature) and it looks really nice. A very nice read. ( )
  J.Green | Aug 26, 2014 |
12 year old Nicholas Mettleson and his younger twin sisters have been sent to spend the summer in Demming, Ohio where their father spent summers growing up. It's a different world from NYC, but "Uncle Nick" - who doesn't have a tv - turns out to be a really great guy and soon he's teaching them how to sail on the lake. Nicholas makes friends with a girl named Charlie who can throw a curve ball no one can hit, learns how to ride a bike, and discovers a secret compartment with an unfinished movie called "The Seaweed Strangler" that his father was making when he was 14 years old and spending the summers there. But they soon discover other secrets - secrets some people would prefer to leave alone - and summer in a small town turns out to be anything but boring.

Although the "mystery" about their father and the seaweed strangler drives the plot along, it's really more of an old-fashioned story about growing up and spending the summer away from parents and home. It's the kind of book I loved to get lost in as an 11 or 12 year old, and always made me wish I had someplace like that to spend the summer. It doesn't go overboard and try too hard to keep kids reading with thrill-a-minute adventure, but charms with a slower and easier pace and a beautiful setting that will make kids wish to be there. The characters are all likable and act like real kids that age, like sometimes annoying each other, and dealing with issues like divorced parents. Still, it's a clean book (there might have been a couple of very mild profanities) and reminded me a little of Gary Schmidtt books, although much more low-key. My advance copy didn't have the artwork, but I looked at it online (through the "look inside" feature) and it looks really nice. A very nice read. ( )
  J.Green | Aug 26, 2014 |
12 year old Nicholas Mettleson and his younger twin sisters have been sent to spend the summer in Demming, Ohio where their father spent summers growing up. It's a different world from NYC, but "Uncle Nick" - who doesn't have a tv - turns out to be a really great guy and soon he's teaching them how to sail on the lake. Nicholas makes friends with a girl named Charlie who can throw a curve ball no one can hit, learns how to ride a bike, and discovers a secret compartment with an unfinished movie called "The Seaweed Strangler" that his father was making when he was 14 years old and spending the summers there. But they soon discover other secrets - secrets some people would prefer to leave alone - and summer in a small town turns out to be anything but boring.

Although the "mystery" about their father and the seaweed strangler drives the plot along, it's really more of an old-fashioned story about growing up and spending the summer away from parents and home. It's the kind of book I loved to get lost in as an 11 or 12 year old, and always made me wish I had someplace like that to spend the summer. It doesn't go overboard and try too hard to keep kids reading with thrill-a-minute adventure, but charms with a slower and easier pace and a beautiful setting that will make kids wish to be there. The characters are all likable and act like real kids that age, like sometimes annoying each other, and dealing with issues like divorced parents. Still, it's a clean book (there might have been a couple of very mild profanities) and reminded me a little of Gary Schmidtt books, although much more low-key. My advance copy didn't have the artwork, but I looked at it online (through the "look inside" feature) and it looks really nice. A very nice read. ( )
  J.Green | Aug 26, 2014 |
Loved this book! Now I'm ready for a lake-side vacation. ( )
  saramcla | Jun 28, 2014 |
Summer at Forsaken Lake is a sweet and nostalgic story. Nicholas, Hetty and Haley Mettleson are sent to spend the summer in Deming, Ohio with their great uncle that they barely know and they are not happy about it. However, once they arrive they find they enjoy the small town life. Uncle Nick teaches them how to sail and they have quite a few adventures during their time in Ohio. This book was enjoyable and has the potential to become an instant classic. ( )
  68papyrus | Jul 1, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0375867422, Hardcover)

With their father en route to Africa for Doctors Without Borders, city-kids Nicholas and younger twin sisters Haley and Hetty are off to spend the summer with their Great-Uncle Nick at his house on Forsaken Lake. Despite some initial doubts, Nicholas is right at home in the country: he learns to sail, learns about his father as a boy, and makes fast friends with a local-girl, the tomboy Charlie.

The summer takes a turn toward the mysterious, though, when Nicholas discovers an old movie that his father made as a boy: it tells the story of the local legend, The Seaweed Strangler, but was never finished. Before long Nicholas wants answers both about the legend, and about the movie. Together, he and Charlie work to uncover the truth and discover some long-buried family secrets along the way.

In this lovely middle-grade novel, Michael D. Beil has invoked one of his own favorites, We Didn't Mean to Go to Sea, as well as other great summer books of years-past.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:41:28 -0400)

Twelve-year-old Nicholas and his ten-year-old twin sisters, Hetty and Haley, spend the summer with their Great-Uncle Nick at Forsaken Lake, where he and their new friend Charlie investigate the truth about an accident involving their families many years before.… (more)

» see all 2 descriptions

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