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Choke by Diana Lopez
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Choke (edition 2012)

by Diana Lopez

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548218,071 (3.64)None
Member:SparklePonies
Title:Choke
Authors:Diana Lopez
Info:Point (2012), Hardcover, 240 pages
Collections:2013 Archive
Rating:***1/2
Tags:Teens, Girls, Issues, Myra Hahn, 2013

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Choke by Diana Lopez

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Choke tells the story of middle school students, Nina, Liz, and Windy who delve into the dangerous game of choking. At first, it seems a risk-free way to get high, but as the choking sessions happen for a longer period of time, the results are disastrous. Teenagers are fearless and yet that fearlessness is unrealistic and dangerous at times.

This book brings up an important issue for young people, but the writing and dialogue were often preachy and dull. The lack of character development is maddening and baffling at times...I would have loved to hear the reasons for Nina's recklessness. We never meet the parents she complains about so much, for example, until the end, when the mother is distraught and weepy. There is, however, a lot to discuss in this book, such as the warning signs of choking: bloodshot eyes, headaches, and listlessness are spelled out as clues. ( )
  jackiewark | Aug 6, 2013 |
Older, adult readers will feel that this book unfolds like the old "After School Specials" of the 1970's. The issue builds up rather obviously, hits a trouble spot, has a tragedy and then wraps up rather nicely. That said, this is a nice book for the tween that reads beyond her grade. The story centers around a friendship that includes a daring and dangerous game. Good lessons on being popular and valuing a trusting and comfortable friendship. The character also has a rewarding relationship with both her parents as well as an elderly friend. I also found it refreshing that this was a story about a Latino family that was not specific to Latino culture, but instead showcased a family dealing with a problem typical of any American teen. ( )
  SparklePonies | Apr 8, 2013 |
The plot is a little weak. I know that it was supposed to raise awareness about the choking game. Obviously, there is not far you can go with just that topic, though I know exactly what I'd do to make it a better book. You can tell the author added different things to make it more interesting, but it just wasn't doing it for me. The ending of the story was the typical thing any person with half a brain could predict.

The main character, in my opinion, is a little too immature for someone about to go to high school.
I think I am a little out of this book's league because it was in the middle grade genre, even though the main character is in the eighth grade. Had I been in maybe the sixth grade, perhaps this would be a great book for me, but alas, I am not in the sixth grade.

Being that I am in the process of writing a book, I have become critical of books a little more, these days. The writing was not excellent, but it was okay. I can't really judge this book fairly, because it was not meant for my age to read it. So here's the verdict:
For ages 12 and younger, I think they should read this book. It deals with good topics and raises awareness about the choking game. Its an appropriate book for that age.

You know how newspapers have filler articles. This was like a filler book. A quick read. It was okay. Won't be reading anything from this lady again. Not because she's a bad writer, but because, I am a little out of its league.

Read the full review at whoistheserialreader.blogspot.com.
  E.S.P. | Mar 9, 2013 |
No, this book wasn't well-written. And what seems like the main topic--the choking game--only takes place a couple times in the book. BUT I like this book for the message.

What this book is really about is that awkward age--here, 8th grade--where you're not a kid but you're not really a teen yet. Everyone is growing, physically and emotionally, at different rates, and it's tough to know who you are. This book is one girl's exploration into finding who she is. The choking game could be anything--alcohol, drugs, sex, whatever. But choking is free and easy and "cool" at first (although the book does end with the terrible consequences).

I read a lot of terrible, terrible issues books, and this is a relatively clean one for the middle school set.

On a superficial note, I love the cover. How intriguing. ( )
  SparklePonies | Feb 14, 2013 |
I was a little disappointed in this book, because it lacked details in some of the chapters. I choses this book because it looked interesting.
  edspicer | Nov 28, 2012 |
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My middle school has the "in-crowd," the "out-crowd," and the "GP."
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0545418224, Hardcover)

A heartfelt novel about the disturbing "choking game" trend -- and one girl's struggle for self-acceptance.

If she could -- if her parents would let her -- eighth-grader Windy would change everything about herself. She'd get highlights in her hair, a new wardrobe; she'd wear makeup. But nothing ever changes. The mean girls at school are still mean, and Windy's best friend Elena is still more interested in making up words than talking about boys.

And then one day, Windy gets the change she's been looking for. New girl Nina -- impossibly cool, confident, and not afraid of anyone -- starts hanging out with Windy! Nina even wants to be "breath sisters." Windy isn't sure what that means, exactly, but she knows she wants to find out. It sounds even better than a BFF.

Windy is right, at first. Being a breath sister gains her a whole new set of friends, girls she feels closer to and cooler with than anyone else. But her inclusion in the new crowd comes at a dangerous price. Windy wants to change everything about her life ... but is she really willing to give up everything in the process?

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:39:45 -0400)

"If she could-if her parents would let her-eighth-grader Windy would change everything about herself. She'd get highlights in her hair, a new wardrobe; she'd wear makeup. But nothing ever changes. The mean girls at school are still mean, and Windy's best friend, Elena, is still more interested in playing dress-up with Windy's cats than talking about boys. Then Nina shows up. The new girl is effortlessly cool and confident-and she starts hanging out with Windy! Nina even wants to be "breath sisters." Windy isn't sure what that means, exactly, but she knows she wants to find out. It sounds even better than a BFF. And it is, in the beginning. Being a breath sister brings Windy a whole new set of friends, girls she feels closer to and cooler with than anyone else. But her inclusion in the new crowd comes with the "choking game," which Windy isn't sure she wants to play. Windy has decided she wants to change everything about her life...but is she willing to give everything up, too?"--Dust jacket.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

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