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Dodger by Terry Pratchett

Dodger (edition 2012)

by Terry Pratchett

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Showing 1-5 of 100 (next | show all)
Reread August 2016. Still wonderful.

Like most of Pratchett's books, this one is highly enjoyable. It's a tale of Victorian London, in which a young man, Dodger, rescues a damsel in distress and comes to the attention of a journalist, Charles Dickens. ( )
  DLMorrese | Oct 14, 2016 |
Thanks to AudioBookSync.com for giving a free Audio recording of this book during their 2015 summer season....

What a lovely story.... I completely enjoyed listening to the recording - it was extremely well done. The story itself was clever indeed. It seemed to have just the right mixture of serious situations, comedy, maturity, love, friendship, etc, etc, etc....

A few things that I particularly liked a lot were: (1) several characters were actually written as historical figures (i.e. Charles Dickens and others) directly into the book's story line thus making this story somewhat of a historical fiction novel which contains real people who lived during the time period. This made the story more enjoyable, gave me a point of reference, and made it more realistic; (2) I loved the fact that one of the supporting characters was a religious Jewish man who survived persecution and other trials in his life. Because I am Jewish too, the story appealed to me that much more; (3) Finally, I loved the down to earth feel that this book and its story line had. It did not feel overly over done. It was just a perfect rendition of a story being told for the purposes of telling it.

Although this was my first book by Terry Pretchett, I have a pretty good feeling it will not be my last. I really loved the writing style and the build up of the story. I loved the secrets that came out in the end. I loved that I was not able to guess what those secrets were despite trying to really hard.

I highly recommend this book to YA from Middle School and older. This is a must read for all. Enjoy.... Happy Reading! ( )
  Bubamdk | Sep 9, 2016 |
This novel is set in something approximating to Victorian London. The star of this book is a young man called Dodger who works as a ‘tosher’: someone who scavenges in sewers for coins and other valuables. Being the hero, he rescues a girl in the first chapter then finds himself thrown into a world inhabited by ‘nobs’ such as Charlie Dickens, the well-known journalist...

The style is that of an adventure story for older children. Dodger finds himself regularly in danger, vanquishing villains, donning disguises. He meets famous people of the era although the author admits that he took some liberties with the time frames. As a piece of social history it works well; I now know considerably more about Victorian sewers than I ever did before.

Some of the subject matter is not suitable for children. While they might laugh at some of the ‘bathroom’ humour, there are unpleasant descriptions of violence and a decaying corpse. Moreover, although there’s nothing explicit, there are several overt references to ‘adult’ topics that should give it at least a ‘12’ rating, in my opinion.

It’s not a long book and I enjoyed it on the whole. Recommended to adults and teenagers who don’t mind a few liberties taken with historical fiction. ( )
  SueinCyprus | Aug 10, 2016 |
Dodger is a young man of the streets whose life is about to change. He is perfectly capable of dodging the peelers and the sharpers, but can he dodge his own fate? A love story, a life story, a moral tale told as only Terry Pratchett can.

This is the sort of book I looked for during the years I homeschooled my children. A terrific story, packed full of nuggets of information to explore. Dodger lives in London in the mid 1800s. A true Dickensian character, he runs up against the likes of Charles Dickens, Benjamin Disraeli, Sir Robert Peel, and Sweeney Todd. Pratchett has honored Henry Mayhew, with this story, showing his inspiration for Ankh-Morpork as well. ( )
  MrsLee | Jul 9, 2016 |
If you’re a regular reader of this blog, then you probably already know how I feel about Terry Pratchett. The man was hilarious and created such wonderful worlds in his writing. What I’m consistently struck by was how much his love for his writing shines through in his works. Dodger is a story about the a poor young man living in Victorian England written by a man who clearly loved writing about all the weirdness and darkness of Victorian England.

In a word, Dodger is simply: fun. There’s mystery, intrigue, drama, and humorous callouts to notable 19th century figures, both fictional and non-fictional. I loved the tie-in to Dickens and Sweeney Todd, and I especially enjoyed learning about Dodger’s world — a world that, I’m sure, was shared by many 19th century London dwellers. This book is plain entertainment, and I love Pratchett for that. The one and only complaint I have for this story is that I didn’t think the ending was paced perfectly, but it didn’t take away from my enjoyment very much, so it’s a small negative thing.

Stephen Briggs did such a good job with narrating this book. When I’m listening to a book, I’m — sadly — probably not paying as much attention as I should be, and I sometimes get lost in terms of who says or does what. Briggs makes it incredibly easy to distinguish between the characters, especially — it seems — paying attention to the social status of each character and letting that reflect in their accent and mode of speaking. Some of the minor characters were given a lot more life than just reading the book would have given them, and I really appreciated the listening experience.

Overall, I recommend Dodger if you have any interest at all for Terry Pratchett books, or if you enjoy a good Victorian England mystery. I had a lot of fun listening to it and think it’s well worth anyone’s time.

Originally posted on Going on to the Next. ( )
  sedelia | Jun 13, 2016 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Pratchett, Terryprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Briggs, StephenNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kidby, PaulIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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To Henry Mayhew for writing his book,
and to Lyn for absolutely
everything else.
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The rain poured down on London so hard that it seemed it was dancing spray, every raindrop contending with its fellow for supremacy in the air and waiting to splash down.
He had been most interested to discover that the Froggies had drains too, pretty good ones, which you would have expected from Froggies, and so he jigged and dodged and ran on to the safe house he had sorted out last night, and he was having the time of his life. - Chapter 16
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"In an alternative version of Victorian London, a seventeen-year-old Dodger, a cunning and cheeky street urchin, unexpectedly rises in life when he saves a mysterious girl, meets Charles Dickens, and unintentionally puts a stop to the murders of Sweeny Todd"--… (more)

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