HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Tuscan Sun Cookbook: Recipes from Our…
Loading...

The Tuscan Sun Cookbook: Recipes from Our Italian Kitchen

by Frances Mayes, Edward Mayes

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
22None476,730NoneNone
None

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

No reviews
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Frances Mayesprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Mayes, Edwardmain authorall editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0307885283, Hardcover)

Featured Recipe: Giusi's Ragù

Sweet Corn and Basil Lasagna

Slow and easy--long-simmered ragù is the quintessential Tuscan soul food. There are as many ways with ragù as there are cooks. This is ours, learned originally from Giusi, who's made it a thousand times. By now, I think we have, too. On many Saturday mornings, Ed makes a huge pot of ragù--tripling, quadrupling the recipe--and another of tomato sauce. We consider these our natural resources. For lunch, while the pots are still on the stove, we spoon ragù over bruschetta, add some cheese, and run it under the broiler. By afternoon, we're ready to fill several glass containers of different sizes and freeze them. We're then free to pull one out during the workweek. Serve ragù in lasagne or over spaghetti and, as you eat, you know you're participating in a communal rite that's being enacted all over the Italian peninsula.

Serves 10

3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 pound ground lean beef 1 pound ground pork 2 Italian sausages, casings removed 1 teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon pepper 2 teaspoons fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried 1 to 2 cups red wine 1 cup soffritto (recipe below) 2 tablespoons tomato paste 16 to 20 tomatoes or 2 28-ounce cans whole tomatoes, juice included, chopped

Pour the olive oil into a 4-quart heavy pot with a lid. Over medium-high heat, brown the meats, breaking up the sausage with a wooden spoon, about 10 minutes. Add the salt, pepper, thyme, and 1 cup of the red wine. After the wine has cooked into the meat, about 10 minutes, add the soffritto, and stir in the tomato paste and tomatoes.

Bring the sauce to a boil, and then lower to a quiet simmer. Partially cover, and continue cooking for 3 hours, stirring now and then. Along the way, add the remaining cup of wine if you think the sauce is too dense.

Soffritto

Serves 10

¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil 1 yellow onion, minced 1 carrot, minced 1 celery stalk, minced 1 handful of flat-leaf parsley, minced ½ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon pepper

Saute the ingredients in a small saucepan over medium-low heat until they begin to color and turn tender, 5 to 7 minutes.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:46:40 -0400)

A collection of more than 150 Italian recipes, focusing on antipasti, primi, secondi, and other dishes.

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
39 wanted1 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: No ratings.

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 91,693,264 books! | Top bar: Always visible