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Toast by Nigel Slater
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Toast (original 2003; edition 2004)

by Nigel Slater

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1,083487,692 (3.67)53
Member:gaskella
Title:Toast
Authors:Nigel Slater
Info:Gotham (2004), Hardcover
Collections:Your library, To read
Rating:****
Tags:Cookery, Memoir, TBR

Work details

Toast by Nigel Slater (2003)

  1. 00
    Tender at the Bone: Growing Up at the Table by Ruth Reichl (Anonymous user)
    Anonymous user: Coming of age with memories related to food. Bittersweet. Funny. Joyful!
  2. 00
    Paperboy by Christopher Fowler (nessreader)
    nessreader: both use obsolescent brand names to evoke the past, describe a circumscribed and very english childhood, and make comedy out of pain.
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English (46)  Finnish (1)  German (1)  All languages (48)
Showing 1-5 of 46 (next | show all)
A lovely little book that works on many levels. Basically, Nigel Slater tells of his childhood by reminiscing about various foods that are associated with incidents in his life. As with all his writing, the food is lovingly described. What is surprising is the descriptions of his childhood. Equally well written, but surprising in it's frankness and in some of the incidents encountered.....

We hear of his relationship with his parents, the loss of his mother, the arrival of and relationship with his step-mother, his sexual awakening and encounters, but most of all he describes the era and it's food (also dated by the times) and his relationship with food and it's preparation. Oh & I can wholeheartedly understand and concur with his hatred of eggs ;-) ( )
  Cassandra2020 | Jan 24, 2016 |
Slater's Toast awoke in me so many past food feelings from my own childhood not just from his sumptuous descriptions of his own past life but because of the proximity our lives shared in the fact that we were raised in towns barely eight miles apart and are within two years of being the same age. The descriptions of past memories of sweets reminded me so much of my childhood, and I think would resonant more with a British audience than American.
My mother, as his, did not enjoy the preparation of food, and while for Slater that led to a life of exploration in food, for me not so much. This is why I enjoyed this book. Not only is it a tell-all tale of a youth hungering for the love of a father that was only occasionally available but one of a life of exuberance, a life that becomes filled with the joy of finding your niche in life and wallowing in it wholeheartedly. If only we all could find that space in our life.
Slater normally writes books on cooking, with recipes, so this was a brave soul-searching stab at a new venture that lets us in on why he is so good at what he does. ( )
  MarkPSadler | Jan 17, 2016 |
Slater's Toast awoke in me so many past food feelings from my own childhood not just from his sumptuous descriptions of his own past life but because of the proximity our lives shared in the fact that we were raised in towns barely eight miles apart and are within two years of being the same age. The descriptions of past memories of sweets reminded me so much of my childhood, and I think would resonant more with a British audience than American.
My mother, as his, did not enjoy the preparation of food, and while for Slater that led to a life of exploration in food, for me not so much. This is why I enjoyed this book. Not only is it a tell-all tale of a youth hungering for the love of a father that was only occasionally available but one of a life of exuberance, a life that becomes filled with the joy of finding your niche in life and wallowing in it wholeheartedly. If only we all could find that space in our life.
Slater normally writes books on cooking, with recipes, so this was a brave soul-searching stab at a new venture that lets us in on why he is so good at what he does. ( )
  MarkPSadler | Jan 17, 2016 |
Slater's Toast awoke in me so many past food feelings from my own childhood not just from his sumptuous descriptions of his own past life but because of the proximity our lives shared in the fact that we were raised in towns barely eight miles apart and are within two years of being the same age. The descriptions of past memories of sweets reminded me so much of my childhood, and I think would resonant more with a British audience than American.
My mother, as his, did not enjoy the preparation of food, and while for Slater that led to a life of exploration in food, for me not so much. This is why I enjoyed this book. Not only is it a tell-all tale of a youth hungering for the love of a father that was only occasionally available but one of a life of exuberance, a life that becomes filled with the joy of finding your niche in life and wallowing in it wholeheartedly. If only we all could find that space in our life.
Slater normally writes books on cooking, with recipes, so this was a brave soul-searching stab at a new venture that lets us in on why he is so good at what he does. ( )
  MarkPSadler | Jan 17, 2016 |
I've seen a couple of Slater's programmes. He's really creepy and disturbing. There's a scene in the book where his father watches him eat ham before losing his temper and throwing Slater's plate across the garden. I know exactly how he feels. I remember watching him spread jam onto a pudding and I just wanted to grab the knife and punch him repeatedly in the head with the handle shouting "Handle your food properly or this is what you get!" And I really am not a violent man at all.

However, this is a very charming book, funny and at times shocking. He has a way of reversing things or jumping from one subject to another that I admire a lot. Peanuts to penises in a single sentence. I read the Radishes section to the guy who sits next to me at work and he was so disturbed he had to go away for quite a while.

A fascinating picture of that rather disturbing time in British cooking (which luckily I'm too young to remember) between Rationing and Curry. The spaghetti and parmesan scene is gold dust. But more than that you get a picture of wider British culture with his nouveaux riche parents struggling to look middle class and the generational split in the 60s... and all told through the medium of food. ( )
  Lukerik | Oct 1, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 46 (next | show all)
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For Digger, Magrath and Poppy

with love

In memory of Elvie 1902-2002
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My mother is scraping a piece of burned toast out of the kitchen window, a crease of annoyance across her forehead.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0143057146, Audio CD)

‘My mother is scraping a piece of burned toast out of the kitchen window, a crease of annoyance across her forehead. This is not an occasional occurrence. My mother burns the toast as surely as the sun rises each morning.’‘Toast’ is Nigel Slater’s award-winning biography of a childhood remembered through food. Whether recalling his mother’s surprisingly good rice pudding, his father’s bold foray into spaghetti and his dreaded Boxing Day stew, or such culinary highlights as Arctic Roll and Grilled Grapefruit (then considered something of a status symbol in Wolverhampton), this remarkable memoir vividly recreates daily life in 1960s suburban England.Likes and dislikes, aversions and sweet-toothed weaknesses form a fascinating backdrop to Nigel Slater’s incredibly moving and deliciously evocative portrait of childhood, adolescence and sexual awakening.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:07:26 -0400)

This is Nigel Slater's truly extraordinary story of his childhood remembered through food. Nigel's likes and dislikes, aversions and sweet-toothed weaknesses form a fascinating and often amusing backdrop to this incredibly moving and evocative memoir of childhood, adolescence and sexual awakening.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

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