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House Held Up by Trees by Ted Kooser
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House Held Up by Trees (edition 2012)

by Ted Kooser (Author), Jon Klassen (Illustrator)

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17520117,580 (3.8)6
Built on a treeless yard by a family who cleared away all the sprouting trees on the property, a house is eventually abandoned and left to deteriorate on a lot that is gradually overrun by wild trees, in a poignant tale of loss, change, and nature's quiet triumph.
Member:runningbeardbooks
Title:House Held Up by Trees
Authors:Ted Kooser (Author)
Other authors:Jon Klassen (Illustrator)
Info:Candlewick (2012), Edition: First Edition, 32 pages
Collections:personal list of to-reads
Rating:
Tags:to-read

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House Held Up by Trees by Ted Kooser

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» See also 6 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 20 (next | show all)
I tagged with my "depressing" tag but I don't think it's depressing so much as melancholy. I loved the illustrations, obviously, because I love Jon Klassen to bits and his illustrations really capture melancholy quite well. The story didn't quite do it for me - a house's people all move away and then house gets pushed up to the sky by the trees all growing around it. It paints a beautiful picture, but it personally didn't touch my heart so much. Maybe it was because, in this library copy I read, some monster underlined a bunch of words in PEN. ( )
  katebrarian | Jul 28, 2020 |
A young boy and girl move into a house with their father. The house is surrounded by grass, but on the edges all around is the forest. The children love the forest, but their father never joins them. He just mows his lawn. Ted Kooser's poetry/prose combined with exquisite illustrations by Jon Klassen make this a classic. ( )
  lisaladdvt | Jun 29, 2019 |
This book showed the growth of a family but also the growth of trees in the family. Ted Kooser did an amazing job writing a story about a father and the desire to keep his house and lawn perfect for his family. When his family grew up and moved away, it was time for the trees to take over and keep the house safe in their branches and growth. Jon Klassen's illustrations are full of different colors and straight smooth lines at the beginning of the story. Towards the end of the book, Klassen's illustrations are more blended with the background and flow together. Klassen still does not use bright bold colors and lines in any part of the book, just like all of the previous books of his I have read. The subtle and calming style he uses is what makes his artwork unique and fits well with the story Ted Kooser has written. ( )
  oleger | Mar 25, 2019 |
Beautifully illustrated, this story from poet Ted Kooser is a two edged coin. From one point of view it's about nature surviving and reclaiming the land when man leaves. But it's also about a father unable to stop the passage of time and has to watch his children leave and finally being unable to hold onto the family home. Perhaps more for slightly older children. And adults who love Jon Klassen's art work - of which I imagine there are many. ( )
  si | May 6, 2018 |
Beautiful illustrations with a great story by a wonderful poet. ( )
  deldevries | Mar 26, 2018 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Ted Kooserprimary authorall editionscalculated
Klassen, JonIllustratorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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Built on a treeless yard by a family who cleared away all the sprouting trees on the property, a house is eventually abandoned and left to deteriorate on a lot that is gradually overrun by wild trees, in a poignant tale of loss, change, and nature's quiet triumph.

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Book description
From Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Ted Kooser and rising talent Jon Klassen comes a poignant tale of loss, change, and nature's quiet triumph.

When the house was new, not a single tree remained on its perfect lawn to give shade from the sun. The children in the house trailed the scent of wild trees to neighboring lots, where thick bushes offered up secret places to play. When the children grew up and moved away, their father, alone in the house, continued his battle against blowing seeds, plucking out sprouting trees. Until one day the father, too, moved away, and as the empty house began its decline, the trees began their approach. At once wistful and exhilarating, this lovely, lyrical story evokes the inexorable passage of time — and the awe-inspiring power of nature to lift us up.
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