HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Congress and the Crisis of the 1850s…
Loading...

Congress and the Crisis of the 1850s (Perspective Hist of Congress…

by Paul Finkelman, Donald R. Kennon

Other authors: Spencer R. Crew (Contributor), Matthew Glassman (Contributor), Amy S. Greenberg (Contributor), Martin J. Hershock (Contributor), Michael F. Holt (Contributor)2 more, Brooks D. Simpson (Contributor), Jenny Wahl (Contributor)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
4None2,467,601NoneNone
Recently added byUSCHS, The_General

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

No reviews
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Paul Finkelmanprimary authorall editionscalculated
Kennon, Donald R.main authorall editionsconfirmed
Crew, Spencer R.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Glassman, MatthewContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Greenberg, Amy S.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Hershock, Martin J.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Michael F. HoltContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Simpson, Brooks D.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Wahl, JennyContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0821419773, Hardcover)

During the long decade from 1848 to 1861 America was like a train speeding down the track, without an engineer or brakes. The new territories acquired from Mexico had vastly increased the size of the nation, but debate over their status—and more importantly the status of slavery within them—paralyzed the nation. Southerners gained access to the territories and a draconian fugitive slave law in the Compromise of 1850, but this only exacerbated sectional tensions. Virtually all northerners, even those who supported the law because they believed that it would preserve the union, despised being turned into slave catchers. In 1854, in the Kansas-Nebraska Act, Congress repealed the ban on slavery in the remaining unorganized territories. In 1857, in the Dred Scott case, the Supreme Court held that all bans on slavery in the territories were unconstitutional. Meanwhile, northern whites, free blacks, and fugitive slaves resisted the enforcement of the 1850 fugitive slave law. In Congress members carried weapons and Representative Preston Brooks assaulted Senator Charles Sumner with a cane, nearly killing him. This was the decade of the 1850s and these were the issues Congress grappled with. This volume of new essays examines many of these issues, helping us better understand the failure of political leadership in the decade that led to the Civil War. 

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:13:20 -0400)

During the long decade from 1848 to 1861 America was like a train speeding down the track, without an engineer or brakes. The new territories acquired from Mexico had vastly increased the size of the nation, but debate over their status-and more importantly the status of slavery within them-paralyzed the nation. Southerners gained access to the territories and a draconian fugitive slave law in the Compromise of 1850, but this only exacerbated sectional tensions. Virtually all northerners, even those who supported the law because they believed that it would preserve the union, despised being

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: No ratings.

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 138,059,397 books! | Top bar: Always visible