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Lord of the Silent by Elizabeth Peters
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Lord of the Silent

by Elizabeth Peters

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1,468167,831 (4)32
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» See also 32 mentions

English (15)  French (1)  All languages (16)
Showing 1-5 of 15 (next | show all)
The Ramses/Nefret angst is not entertaining, but otherwise this book was as enjoyable as the others in the series. ( )
  themulhern | Feb 3, 2019 |
Another really good story by Peters! She is also fantastic at character creation & development. Her characters always feel so real. They really bring life to the story. Looking forward to seeing what the Emersons get into next... ( )
  EmpressReece | Aug 22, 2016 |
I'm a fan of the Amelia Peabody series in general. This book wasn't as good as some of the others in the series. It's set during WWI after Ramses has done a spy mission. One of the people he spied against escapes and tries to kill him and then turns up dead at the Emersons excavation site. There is a lso the possible return of the master Criminal. Not as much action as some of the other books but still plenty of humor ( )
  RachelNF | Jan 15, 2016 |
Lord Of The Silent, by Elizabeth Peters
★★★★ and a ♥ for the whole series

Synopsis: For archaeologist Amelia Peabody and her family, the allure of Egypt remains as powerful as ever, even in this tense time of World War. But nowhere in this desert land is safe -- especially for Amelia's son Ramses and Nefret. Treachery and peril are pursuing the two young adventurers across the length and breadth of this strange, exotic world. And the grim discovery of a recent corpse in a tomb where it does not belong is pulling Amelia deeper into a furious desert storm of intrigue, corruption, kidnapping, and murder -- and toward dark revelations that threaten to awaken the past...and alter the family's destiny
In A Sentence: a good installment in the Amelia Peabody series, possibly one of the top ten
My Thoughts: I have finally finished the series! Yay!
I admit I had read this earlier when I was working through this series, but I accidently downloaded the abridged version on Audible. Abridged fiction books for adults are the most ridiculous things ever, and the one I listened to was not only really confusing, but the editor cut out all the best parts! What the heck?! There was enough of the plot that I recognized from the last time I read the book, so I didn’t catch the deception until I was nearing the end; I just thought that the book wasn’t as good as I remembered and the rest of the book just didn’t download properly. Suffice it to say that I found myself in a really frustrating scenario: either finished the abridged atrocity and move on through the series, or start over with a full version. I didn’t want to start all the way over again, so I decided I would finish the abridged one and re-read the full version once I had finished the entire series.
Now that I have read the full version, I like the book so much better. The typical Amelia Peabody humor is there, as well as a plot with good flow. The storyline in this one was a bit more straightforward than other ones, without several confusing twists and turns, which I prefer since that allows the humor and character development to shine a bit more. Plus, this book showed the result of something that had been ongoing in previous novels, which makes me happy (I’m not going to spoil anything for you!)
So now that I’m done with the whole series, how do I feel? Disappointed yet relieved. I wish the final books were better and went along the lines of this novel, but I really did enjoy the whole series. Amelia Peabody is funny and adventurous, and I love the equality you see in these stories. The Egyptians might work for Emerson, but they are treated fairly and equally without fail. Abdullah was given the highest respect by the Emersons, his grandson David Todros ended up marrying Englishwoman, and Selim and Daoud are frequently involved in the adventures; they even join the Emersons at English-based events and celebrations. We’re talking about a time period where Egyptians were looked down upon by the occupying English; they were viewed as unintelligent and backwards, so it’s refreshing to see a group of archaeologists consider Abdullah’s family as part of their own family.
And it’s not just equality between two types of people and two types of religion, it’s equality for women as well. The female protagonists in these novels are strong and independent, and they insist on entering into professions that are dominated by men. I am such a feminist, so stories that promote equality and equal opportunities constantly find their way onto my favorites list.
This is a great series for lovers of mystery and historical fiction. It also has a bit of romance as well, but it’s definitely more about the love story and not about the act of making love (those scenes are edited out: you know it happened, and that it was good, but the rest is left to your imagination). I will always love these books, and I can guarantee that I’ll read them again a few years down the road, but for now I’m glad that the series is done. I’m ready to move on. So long Amelia Peabody! Until we meet again!
( )
  Spirolim | Jan 13, 2016 |
Lord Of The Silent, by Elizabeth Peters
★★★★ and a ♥ for the whole series

Synopsis: For archaeologist Amelia Peabody and her family, the allure of Egypt remains as powerful as ever, even in this tense time of World War. But nowhere in this desert land is safe -- especially for Amelia's son Ramses and Nefret. Treachery and peril are pursuing the two young adventurers across the length and breadth of this strange, exotic world. And the grim discovery of a recent corpse in a tomb where it does not belong is pulling Amelia deeper into a furious desert storm of intrigue, corruption, kidnapping, and murder -- and toward dark revelations that threaten to awaken the past...and alter the family's destiny
In A Sentence: a good installment in the Amelia Peabody series, possibly one of the top ten
My Thoughts: I have finally finished the series! Yay!
I admit I had read this earlier when I was working through this series, but I accidently downloaded the abridged version on Audible. Abridged fiction books for adults are the most ridiculous things ever, and the one I listened to was not only really confusing, but the editor cut out all the best parts! What the heck?! There was enough of the plot that I recognized from the last time I read the book, so I didn’t catch the deception until I was nearing the end; I just thought that the book wasn’t as good as I remembered and the rest of the book just didn’t download properly. Suffice it to say that I found myself in a really frustrating scenario: either finished the abridged atrocity and move on through the series, or start over with a full version. I didn’t want to start all the way over again, so I decided I would finish the abridged one and re-read the full version once I had finished the entire series.
Now that I have read the full version, I like the book so much better. The typical Amelia Peabody humor is there, as well as a plot with good flow. The storyline in this one was a bit more straightforward than other ones, without several confusing twists and turns, which I prefer since that allows the humor and character development to shine a bit more. Plus, this book showed the result of something that had been ongoing in previous novels, which makes me happy (I’m not going to spoil anything for you!)
So now that I’m done with the whole series, how do I feel? Disappointed yet relieved. I wish the final books were better and went along the lines of this novel, but I really did enjoy the whole series. Amelia Peabody is funny and adventurous, and I love the equality you see in these stories. The Egyptians might work for Emerson, but they are treated fairly and equally without fail. Abdullah was given the highest respect by the Emersons, his grandson David Todros ended up marrying Englishwoman, and Selim and Daoud are frequently involved in the adventures; they even join the Emersons at English-based events and celebrations. We’re talking about a time period where Egyptians were looked down upon by the occupying English; they were viewed as unintelligent and backwards, so it’s refreshing to see a group of archaeologists consider Abdullah’s family as part of their own family.
And it’s not just equality between two types of people and two types of religion, it’s equality for women as well. The female protagonists in these novels are strong and independent, and they insist on entering into professions that are dominated by men. I am such a feminist, so stories that promote equality and equal opportunities constantly find their way onto my favorites list.
This is a great series for lovers of mystery and historical fiction. It also has a bit of romance as well, but it’s definitely more about the love story and not about the act of making love (those scenes are edited out: you know it happened, and that it was good, but the rest is left to your imagination). I will always love these books, and I can guarantee that I’ll read them again a few years down the road, but for now I’m glad that the series is done. I’m ready to move on. So long Amelia Peabody! Until we meet again!
( )
  Spirolim | Jan 13, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 15 (next | show all)
Feeling a bit overwhelmed by all the characters in LORD OF THE SILENT... Amelia is still a joy.... But it takes a lot more concentration to keep track of the swarms of adopted children, relatives, native associates, political enemies and family cats that have accrued to the series since 1975. By the time Peters fills us in on the progression of these domestic dynasties, there's hardly any time left to play in the tombs.

added by y2pk | editNew York Times, Marilyn Stasio (Jun 10, 2001)
 
As always in this series of uproarious Egyptological mysteries, plenty of strange doings are afoot in the desert, and readers will find all the delicious trappings of a vintage Peters extravaganza—lost tombs, kidnappings, deadly attacks, mummies and sinister villains.
added by lquilter | editPublishers Weekly (Apr 23, 2001)
 
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"I challenge even you, Peabody, to find a silver lining in this situation," Emerson remarked.
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Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
For archaeologist Amelia Peabody and her family, the allure of Egypt remains as powerful as ever, even in 1915, as a World War rages.
But nowhere in this exotic land is safe - especially for Amelia's son Ramses and his beautiful new wife Nefret.
Treachery and danger pursue the two young lovers across the desert nation, strengthening a bond of passion and devotion that only death can sever. And the grim discovery of a recent corpse in a tomb where it does not belong is pulling Amelia deeper into a storm of intrigue, corruption, kidnapping, and murder - and toward dark revelations that threaten to awake the past...and alter the family's destiny.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0380817144, Mass Market Paperback)

Amelia Peabody Emerson is the Mary Poppins of Egypt. Forthright, intrepid, and industrious, she brooks no nonsense from anyone and is armed with an apparently magical parasol. As the legions of fans of Elizabeth Peters's Edwardian archeological mystery series know, Amelia is also possessed of a swift temper, an incorrigible curiosity, and an uncanny proclivity for attracting trouble. But in 1915, with the world gripped by the madness of war, trouble is endemic. In an effort to prevent their son Ramses from being coerced into working for British intelligence (in the sort of endeavor that nearly got him killed a year earlier when he infiltrated a band of Egyptian nationalists and prevented a Turkish-backed uprising), Amelia and husband Emerson and the rest of their dizzyingly large entourage flee England for the reassuringly stoic splendor of their beloved Egyptian ruins.

So much for a quiet dig among the mastabas. With their usual luck, the family promptly finds itself inundated by would-be assassins and nosy journalists. Amelia quickly deduces that Ramses's undercover work is at the root of both threat and curiosity; more puzzling is the appearance of the odd corpse or two and a rash of stunningly efficient tomb robberies. When Ramses and his wife, Nefret, travel to Luxor to check on the security of some of their old excavations, they find an all-too-familiar irritant behind the robberies. It would be telling to reveal his identity, but fans of the series will soon figure it out, with the aid of a little suspension of disbelief. With Ramses and Nefret on one hand, and Amelia and Emerson on the other, engaged in "protecting" the other side from conflict and trouble, the novel unfolds in a merry chase of misdirection and miscommunication.

There is a comforting consistency to Peters's series. By now, all of the characters' quirks are etched in stone like so many well-worn hieroglyphs. Amelia's narrative has the familiarity of a treasured and oft-read letter from a slightly batty aunt. Even the miraculous return of (no, I really can't say), though perhaps intended as a radical plot twist, adheres to the most genteel of mystery traditions, à la Doyle and Christie. Innovation can be overrated; with Peters's flawless record of producing amusing, easily digested novels showing no signs of faltering, fans should devour this morsel--and wait impatiently for the next tasty installment. --Kelly Flynn

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:20:22 -0400)

(see all 6 descriptions)

For archaeologist Amelia Peabody and her family, the allure of Egypt remains as powerful as ever, even in this tense time of World War. But nowhere in this desert land is safe -- especially for Amelia's son Ramses and his beautiful new wife Nefret. Treachery and peril are pursuing the two young lovers across the length and breadth of this strange, exotic world, strengthening a bond of passion and devotion that only death can sever. And the grim discovery of a recent corpse in a tomb where it does not belong is pulling Amelia deeper into a furious desert storm of intrigue, corruption, kidnapping, and murder -- and toward dark revelations that threaten to awaken the past...and alter the family's destiny.… (more)

» see all 8 descriptions

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