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The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led…
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The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There (original 2012; edition 2012)

by Catherynne M. Valente, Ana Juan (Illustrator)

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Member:thefirstalicat
Title:The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There
Authors:Catherynne M. Valente
Other authors:Ana Juan (Illustrator)
Info:Feiwel & Friends (2012), Hardcover, 272 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:children's, fantasy

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The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There by Catherynne M. Valente (2012)

2012 (7) 2013 (9) adventure (12) ARC (11) children (8) children's (17) children's fiction (6) children's literature (6) ebook (6) faerie (10) fairies (9) fairy tale (9) fairy tales (17) fairyland (15) fantasy (112) fiction (42) goodreads (6) illustrated (8) Kindle (6) magic (16) novel (9) quest (5) read in 2013 (6) series (13) shadows (9) signed (7) to-read (35) underworld (5) YA (26) young adult (27)
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» See also 63 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 39 (next | show all)
It feels like the "Wow, I want to quote this" moments are not quite as densely packed as it was in the first book. Still, it was a lovely trip to Fairyland and I can't wait for the next one. ( )
  bishopza | Feb 7, 2014 |
Not since the Harry Potter series have we seen different facets of our favourite characters through the lens of the hero. One of my favourite aspects of Harry Potter was how the characters remained true to themselves but we got to see how they changed through Harry. Professor McGonagall seemed less strict through the eyes of a grown-up.
September is growing up. [I do hope she never grows up too much.]
The charm of these books is the aspect of trying to get home the entire time from classic fantasy genres are gone. The Fairyland books have a healthy balance between wanting your own life but also the wildness of fairyland. Adventure, Quests and magical lovely friends.
The lovely Sundays reading in companiable silence sounded nice and relatable to my own life of wanting to be away from work or in my youth, school. The nice quite times get their special spot in September's life.

She returns to Fairyland a year after the events of The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making. This time she chases a silver figure back into fairyland. This time it's her cut-off shadow Halloween whose made things topsy turvy by stealing shadows.
Without their shadows the citizens of fairyland have lost their magic thus have to use ration cards.
The ration cards are similar to September's own life back home during the war.
Everyone's shadow selves are a darker version of who they once were. Ell and Saturday are not quite like the friends she left behind from the first book.
Now that September is growing up and is not quite so heartless she feels like must put things right since it is her shadow causing all of the trouble.

While my favourite characters from The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making aren't exactly the same they are still just as loveable. We're just viewing them from a different angle.
Abguirine, the night Dodo, is my new favourite friend she makes.

This book reminded me more of the Alice books than it's predecessor [which reminded me more of Oz & Labryinth] because of the Dodo bird, tea and chess references. ( )
  peptastic | Dec 10, 2013 |
Not since the Harry Potter series have we seen different facets of our favourite characters through the lens of the hero. One of my favourite aspects of Harry Potter was how the characters remained true to themselves but we got to see how they changed through Harry. Professor McGonagall seemed less strict through the eyes of a grown-up.
September is growing up. [I do hope she never grows up too much.]
The charm of these books is the aspect of trying to get home the entire time from classic fantasy genres are gone. The Fairyland books have a healthy balance between wanting your own life but also the wildness of fairyland. Adventure, Quests and magical lovely friends.
The lovely Sundays reading in companiable silence sounded nice and relatable to my own life of wanting to be away from work or in my youth, school. The nice quite times get their special spot in September's life.

She returns to Fairyland a year after the events of The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making. This time she chases a silver figure back into fairyland. This time it's her cut-off shadow Halloween whose made things topsy turvy by stealing shadows.
Without their shadows the citizens of fairyland have lost their magic thus have to use ration cards.
The ration cards are similar to September's own life back home during the war.
Everyone's shadow selves are a darker version of who they once were. Ell and Saturday are not quite like the friends she left behind from the first book.
Now that September is growing up and is not quite so heartless she feels like must put things right since it is her shadow causing all of the trouble.

While my favourite characters from The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making aren't exactly the same they are still just as loveable. We're just viewing them from a different angle.
Abguirine, the night Dodo, is my new favourite friend she makes.

This book reminded me more of the Alice books than it's predecessor [which reminded me more of Oz & Labryinth] because of the Dodo bird, tea and chess references. ( )
  peptastic | Dec 3, 2013 |
Catherynne M. Valente’s Fairyland trilogy recalls classic tales very clearly, but, rather than coming across as redundant, Valente weaves them together into something wholly new. The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There (TGWFBF for short) dives back into the vibrant world of Fairyland, adding further depth and wonder to an already glorious world.

Read the full review at A Reader of Fictions. ( )
  A_Reader_of_Fictions | Oct 10, 2013 |
Summary: It's been a year, human time, since September has returned from Fairyland, and she's started to grow up (at least a little), but when the opportunity comes to return, she leaps at the chance. But once she gets to Fairyland, she realizes that things have gone badly wrong in her absence - and worse, that it might all be her fault. For the shadows of the inhabitants of Fairyland are being sucked into Fairyland Below, and the magic in Fairyland is correspondingly waning, and September suspects that it is the doing of her own shadow, the one that she gave up the first time she was in Fairyland. In order to stop the destruction, September must journey to Fairyland Below, where she meets up with her friends A-through-L and Saturday - or at least with their shadows - and find some way to restore order, even if it means confronting her own shadow to do it.

Review: For me, most of The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland..., the first book in the series, was enjoyable if not socks-knockingly so. I like fairy tales, I like modern takes on fairy tales, I like modern takes on fairy tales that use lots of vocabulary and don't talk down to their readers and where you can feel the narrator grinning at you slyly. So I liked The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland... and I liked The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland..., but the first book had a phenomenal twist at the end that pushed the whole thing over into "love" territory, whereas this book didn't quite make it there.

I mean, it was good. I enjoyed listening to it. It was episodic, but that comes with the nature of this kind of story. I liked watching September deal with A-through-L's and Saturday's shadows, how they're like her friends but not quite like her friends, but also a part of her friends that was there all along. That was a complex idea that was presented appropriately for the age group but still had quite a lot of depth to untangle. S. J. Tucker does a lovely job with the narration. Her voices were distinct and diverse and well suited to a fairy story: not quite normal but not completely outlandish, either, and her precise diction and overall tone were a perfect fit for Valente's pseudo-Victorian and slightly smirking prose. I also loved the addition of Aubergine the dodo, and the explication of Questing Physicks was exactly the kind of story deconstruction I like best, about some of my favorite types of stories.

But for as much as I enjoyed the individual pieces, I didn't think they fit together in this book as well as they did in the previous one. There were a lot of elements, which is to be expected, but not all of them were as well developed as they could have been, and the way they came together at the end felt convenient rather than organic. Between the shadows and the Alleyman and Halloween's plans and the Prince Who Sleeps at the Bottom of the World and the various Physics and the mechanics of Fairyland Below, there was just a whole lot of stuff going on, yet there was never that one piece that made it all click together into something more than the sum of its parts. But tricks like the end of The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland are hard to pull off, and I'm still satisfied with this book as a fun reading experience, even without that extra something. 4 out of 5 stars.

Recommendation: There are a lot of elements in this story that depend on a familiarity with the first book, so start at the beginning. But the series as a whole is good fun for kids who like fairy stories, and adults who never grew out of them. ( )
1 vote fyrefly98 | Oct 6, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 39 (next | show all)
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Catherynne M. Valenteprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Juan, AnaIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Tucker, S. J.Narratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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For everyone who has taken a chance on a girl with a funny name and her flying Library.  Let the Revel begin.
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Once upon a time, a girl named September had a secret.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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After returning to Fairyland, September discovers that her stolen shadow has become the Hollow Queen, the new ruler of Fairyland Below, who is stealing the magic and shadows from Fairyland folk and refusing to give them back.

(summary from another edition)

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