HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Just Send Me Word: A True Story of Love and…
Loading...

Just Send Me Word: A True Story of Love and Survival in the Gulag (2012)

by Orlando Figes

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
915132,676 (4.1)9
None

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 9 mentions

English (4)  Dutch (1)  All languages (5)
Showing 4 of 4
Non-fiction! Years of letters between Lev, a political prisoner in the Gulag, and Sveta, his girlfriend. It’s an amazing story and a glimpse into a world most of us can’t even imagine. Figues does a great job of weaving the letters together and providing them with context while letting Lev & Sveta’s words stand on their own. ( )
  maureene87 | Apr 4, 2013 |
Het verhaal van een liefde tussen twee jonge mensen standhoudt ondanks de goelagterreur. ( )
  joucy | Jan 4, 2013 |
Lev and Svetlana's fresh, youthful faces shine out from photographs taken in the days before WWII. Two intelligent, educated young people with their lives ahead of them and so very much in love. However life for Lev Mishchenko, an orphan whose parents had perished in Siberia following the Bolshevik revolution, and the independent and spirited Svetlana, would be anything but easy.

Long, enforced separations cruelly kept the two young Muscovite lovers apart for many years. Lev was initially imprisoned by the Germans at Buchenwald but on being 'liberated' by fellow Russian troops was subject to intense investigation - had these returning POW's been loyal to the Motherland during their incarceration?

'Naively, Lev clung to the belief that if he told the truth he would
be allowed to go home. He believed in Soviet justice........'.

How wrong he was. Duped into signing an admittance of treason, Lev was sentenced to ten years in a 'corrective labour camp' in the far north of Russia.

Having lost touch with Svetlana during the relentless chaos of this period, Lev had little reason to imagine a reconciliation in these bleak circumstances when

"I went to get the letters for our friends, and couldn't help but feel a little envious, I didn't expect anything for myself. And suddenly--there was my name, and,
as if it was alive, your handwriting."

And so began a correspondence that amounted to 1,246 letters, 647 from Lev and 599 from Svetlana, smuggled in and out of the Gulag by outside workers sympathetic with their plight. It is these uncensored, preserved letters form the basis of this brilliant book.

Towards the end of the book Lev and Svetlana's care-worn faces shine out of a photograph. Two intelligent, educated elderly people with most of their remarkable lives behind them and so very much in love.

Those who have read anything by Orlando Figes do not need to be told of his scrupulous research and easy style of writing. Not only a love story, but a description of the Gulag 'system', in which approximately 14 million people passed through these labour camps from 1929 to 1953, with 1.6 million or so perishing in the process. ( )
1 vote Stromata | Nov 20, 2012 |
A wonderful story of faithfulness, loyalty, courage and power positivism. How to surrendrr and yet fight.
  Olofeh | Sep 3, 2012 |
Showing 4 of 4
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to the English one.
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Black and enduring separation

I share equally with you.

Why weep? Give me your hand,

Promise me you will come again.

You and I are like high mountains

And we cannot move closer.

Just send me word

At midnight sometime through the stars.

Anna Akhmatova, 'In Dream' (1946)
Dedication
First words
Lev saw Svetlana first.
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0805095225, Hardcover)

A heroic love story and an unprecedented inside view of one of Stalin's most notorious labor camps, based on a remarkable cache of letters smuggled in and out of the Gulag

"I went to get the letters for our friends, and couldn't help but feel a little envious, I didn't expect anything for myself. And suddenly—there was my name, and, as if it was alive, your handwriting."

In 1946, after five years as a prisoner—first as a Soviet POW in Nazi concentration camps, then as a deportee (falsely accused of treason) in the Arctic Gulag—twenty-nine-year-old Lev Mishchenko unexpectedly received a letter from Sveta, the sweetheart he had hardly dared hope was still alive. Amazingly, over the next eight years the lovers managed to exchange more than 1,500 messages, and even to smuggle Sveta herself into the camp for secret meetings. Their recently discovered correspondence is the only known real-time record of life in Stalin's Gulag, unmediated and uncensored.

Orlando Figes, "the great storyteller of modern Russian historians" (Financial Times), draws on Lev and Sveta's letters as well as KGB archives and recent interviews to brilliantly reconstruct the broader world in which their story unfolded. With the powerful narrative drive of a novel, Just Send Me Word reveals a passion and endurance that triumphed over the tragic forces of history.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:21:58 -0400)

"A heroic love story and an unprecedented inside view of one of Stalin's most notorious labor camps, based on a remarkable cache of letters smuggled in and out of the Gulag."

» see all 3 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
23 wanted3 pay5 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.1)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 1
3.5 1
4 9
4.5 2
5 2

Penguin Australia

Two editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 1846144884, 0241955904

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 92,737,693 books! | Top bar: Always visible