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The Woman Who Died A Lot: A Thursday Next…
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The Woman Who Died A Lot: A Thursday Next Novel (edition 2012)

by Jasper Fforde

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
1,051728,009 (4.03)1 / 104
Member:karieh
Title:The Woman Who Died A Lot: A Thursday Next Novel
Authors:Jasper Fforde
Info:Viking Adult (2012), Edition: First Edition, Hardcover, 384 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:Fiction, 2013

Work details

The Woman Who Died a Lot by Jasper Fforde

  1. 00
    Kurt Busiek's Astro City: Confession by Kurt Busiek (TomWaitsTables)
    TomWaitsTables: "The Nearness of You" in Confession & "Jenny" in The Woman Who Died A Lot.
  2. 01
    The Bear Went Over the Mountain: A Novel (Owl Book) by William Kotzwinkle (4leschats)
    4leschats: This book is the closest that I have read to the metafictional aspects of Fforde's work. Kotzwinkle uses a bear to underscore the absurdities within the publishing industry.
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English (71)  Swedish (1)  All languages (72)
Showing 1-5 of 71 (next | show all)
Enjoyable, but while the story itself was stand alone, I felt I would have got more from it if I had read books 2-6 before this. ( )
  jkdavies | Jun 14, 2016 |
Enjoyable, but while the story itself was stand alone, I felt I would have got more from it if I had read books 2-6 before this. ( )
  jkdavies | Jun 14, 2016 |
I am a proud Fforde fanatic, and I’ve sadly been a little lax in catching up with the Thursday Next series, but I’ve finally made it to this one! It’s really exciting when I get to read a book I’ve been meaning to read forever, so I was thrilled when I was able to request this from the library. I think it took me only a few days to get through it, because I was so happy to be back in this strange universe Fforde has created.

One of the things I’m most impressed about this series is how Fforde allows it to expand and grow. Seven books is a lot for one set of characters, but their stories don’t stagnate — it’s not seven books of a young Thursday Next fighting crime in the BookWorld; instead, she’s getting older now, and while she’s still focused on fighting crime, she has injuries and children and a husband, which means that each novel evolves to become a full-fledged story in its own right. I really love that and it’s sad how many series don’t allow their characters to develop and mature to another stage of life. Of course, with this particular universe, there’s a lot of flexibility for what Fforde can do, but I appreciate that he’s using it to its fullest extent.

I enjoyed the way this book developed all of the conflicts going on. I expected a lot of different things to happen, but I was always surprised by how things were resolved. As always, I appreciate Fforde’s humor; even when very serious, dramatic things are happening in the story, there is something to laugh about — a little embarrassing when you’re reading at work, but overall a good thing for the novel in general.

The new characters that are introduced in this book are amazing. I thought I was going to hate Phoebe Smalls for taking over what should have been Thursday’s position, but like Thursday, I grew to enjoy her enthusiasm and willingness to put herself in danger for the greater good. Without spoiling too many details, I also really appreciated reading about Tuesday’s attempts to be a normal high school student and the people she meets at high school.

This is a great addition to the Thursday Next series, and I’m so excited to continue the series when a new book comes out. If you’ve read the series, know that this one won’t be a disappointment. If you haven’t — it’s 7 books in, and I’m still loving it. If it sounds like your thing, give it a try.

Originally posted on Going on to the Next. ( )
  sedelia | May 3, 2016 |
What was once a really good series became seriously confusing mishmosh of bad writing and in turn horrible reading. I will not be reading book 8. I couldhardly make it through this book. Horrible ( )
  nraichlin | Jan 26, 2016 |
The Woman Who Died A Lot by Jasper Fforde - very good

Ah, Jasper is back on form! This is the Thursday Next that we know and love. All the usual puns and nonsense, a good plot, good characters and nicely tees up for the next in the series. Can't wait.

If you are already a fan of Jasper Fforde and the TN series, you will love it. If not, then don't start here - you will be totally confused. Start with The Eyre Affair.
( )
  Cassandra2020 | Jan 24, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 71 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (2 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Jasper Ffordeprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Allen, ThomasCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Colling-Blackman, PhillipIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Meconis, DylanIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Miceli, JayaCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mudron, BillIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Roberts, MaggyIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Roberts, StuartIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Dedication
To all the librarians
that have ever been,
ever will be,
are now,
this book is respectfully dedicated.
First words
Everything comes to an end.
Quotations
"A drawn elephant has a desire to exist?"

"Certainly. All of existence came into being simply because it wanted to be. The big bang wasn't so much a big bang as a hasty dash toward an opportunity to trade nothingness for somethingness. The main contributory factor to the entire universe was a momentary effect in need of a cause. And in that split second, everything that wanted to have existence -- which is everything -- came racing through in one huge hot mass. They've been trying to sort themselves out ever since."
Budget meetings have never been interesting, ever, despite numerous attempts over the years to try to josh them up a bit. Notable uplifting techniques involved the use of fire-eaters and performing elephants, but they didn't work. The dry proceedings are well known to bring on a form of lethargy that can stay with attendees for the rest of the week, and Budget Therapy was used with great success in the treatment of patients suffering an excess of good-natured perkiness.
"Working in fiction does give one a somewhat tenuous hold on reality, but it's not the hold that's tenuous -- it's the reality: Which reality? Whose reality? Does it matter anyway? And will there be cake?"
"What a beautifully described morning!"
"Do I have to talk to insane people?"

"You're a librarian now. I'm afraid it's mandatory."   Chap. 22
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 067002502X, Hardcover)

The newest tour de force starring Thursday Next in the New York Times bestselling series

The Bookworld’s leading enforcement officer, Thursday Next, has been forced into a semiretirement following an assassination attempt, returning home to Swindon and her family to recuperate.

But Thursday’s children have problems that demand she become a mother of invention: Friday’s career struggles in the Chronoguard, where he is relegated to a might-have-been; Tuesday’s trouble perfecting the Anti-Smote shield, needed in time to thwart an angry Deity’s promise to wipe Swindon off the face of the earth; and the issue of Thursday’s third child, Jenny, who doesn’t exist except as a confusing and disturbing memory.

With Goliath attempting to replace Thursday at every opportunity with synthetic Thursdays, and a call from the Bookworld to hunt down Pagerunners who have jumped into the Realworld, Thursday’s convalescence is going to be anything but restful as the week ahead promises to be one of the Next family’s oddest.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:16:59 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

The Bookworld's leading enforcement officer, Thursday Next, has been forced into a semiretirement following an assassination attempt, returning home to Swindon and her family to recuperate. But Thursday's children have problems that demand she become a mother of invention: Friday's career struggles in the Chronoguard, where he is relegated to a might-have-been; Tuesday's trouble perfecting the Anti-Smote shield, needed in time to thwart an angry Deity's promise to wipe Swindon off the face of the earth; and the issue of Thursday's third child, Jenny, who doesn't exist except as a confusing and disturbing memory. With Goliath attempting to replace Thursday at every opportunity with synthetic Thursdays, and a call from the Bookworld to hunt down Pagerunners who have jumped into the Realworld, Thursday's convalescence is going to be anything but restful as the week ahead promises to be one of the Next family's oddest.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 7 descriptions

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