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Mad River by John Sandford
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Mad River (edition 2012)

by John Sandford

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6862113,895 (3.9)7
Member:JoMacMears
Title:Mad River
Authors:John Sandford
Info:Simon & Schuster Ltd (2012), Hardcover
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
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Mad River by John Sandford

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Showing 1-5 of 21 (next | show all)
Synopsis: Three kids go on a killing spree. Virgil is on their trail but finds that there may have been a trigger for this rampage that has more to do with a husband's envy for his wife's money than simply with dead-enders looking for thrills.
Review: While this is a good read, it didn't have as many lighter parts as other Virgil Flowers novels. ( )
  DrLed | Sep 7, 2016 |
As always, you can't go wrong with a John Sanford novel. Virgil Flowers is starting to grow on me. I absolutely love the Lucas Davenport "Prey" books and wasn't thrilled with a new character but Virgil definitely grows on you. I listened to this in the car and once again, it kept me running errands longer than I needed to. This is about three young people who make very poor decisions. Recommended. ( )
  Dianekeenoy | Aug 28, 2016 |
I've been bummed at the downturn in the quality of recent output from two of my other favorite writers in this genre, Michael Connelly and Ridley Pearson, so I was pleasantly surprised that John Sandford's latest is just as fine as all his others. It's a great read, with a believable story line, great dialogue, credible situations for the law enforcement characters... all the hallmarks of Mr. Sandford's previous successful novels.

Lucas Davenport was one of the best long-term characters developed in this genre, and the transition to the younger-and-fairly-similar-but-different new star, Virgil Flowers, has been great to experience. I really appreciate the way Sandford has kept Davenport involved in a key role, but has let Flowers carry the ball. It's been a smooth transition that seems to have been carefully planned and successfully executed.

I've heard Mad City's plot compared to both Bonnie and Clyde and Natural Born Killers. Both are valid, I guess, but I'd compare it to more of a 'needle and a haystack' story. Bad stuff happens, the criminals hide in a rural part of the state, more bad stuff happens as they move from hiding place to hiding place, and Virgil and the local authorities always seem to be a step behind. In the meantime, the situation turns into a political nightmare, pressure mounts on law enforcers, the randomness of the initial event turns out to be not so random, and bad stuff continues. Sandford does a great job creating a manic atmosphere for both the criminals and the good guys, and as always Virgil works his magic in his spare time on the local female population.

John Sandford has created yet another winner for his faithful readers. Anyone unfamiliar with his work can literally pick out any of his books as a start, but the farther you go back into his catalog, the better. ( )
  gmmartz | Jun 21, 2016 |
Three down on their luck young people start on a spree that results in body upon body as they run in circles for their lives. Virgil Flowers is their only hope of staying alive, but the local law has other ideas. It was a good book. I always like John Sandford's books. This one began to drag a bit toward the end but overall it was well up to his standards. ( )
  Carol420 | May 31, 2016 |
I usually tear through a Virgil Flowers escapade in a day maybe two. This took me over 2 months. Granted I had a really shitty personal life at the time but this didn't do the trick for me like they have up to this point. Cant put my finger on it other than to say I didn't see my old Buddy that f*****g Flowers anywhere on these pages. ( )
  debavp | May 22, 2016 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
John Sandfordprimary authorall editionscalculated
Conger, EricNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Bonnie and Clyde, they thought. And what's-his-name, the sidekick. Three teenagers with dead-end lives, and chips on their shoulders, and guns. The first person they killed was a highway patrolman. The second was a woman during a robbery. Then, hell, why not keep on going? As their crime spree cuts a swath through rural Minnesota, some of it is captured on the killers' cell phones and sent to a local television station. Bureau of Criminal Apprehension investigator Virgil Flowers joins the growing army of cops trying to run them down. But even he doesn't realize what is about to happen next.The next novel in the Virgil Flowers series.… (more)

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