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Carrie by Stephen King
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Carrie (edition 2002)

by Stephen King

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8,833184341 (3.71)304
So, if you've ever considered bullying the outcast kid or not telling your teenage daughter what to expect when she officially hits puberty, this is the book that will change your mind forever! ;)

I saw the movie starring Sissy Spacek as Carrie many years ago, but since this was Stephen King's first published novel, I really wanted to actually read it. ...and as is the case with so many books-that-have-been-turned-into-movies, the book is so much better due the details provided, and the terrifying emotions evoked. I loved the way King alternated his writing styles, mixing third-person narrative with excerpts from legal depositions and first-person witness accounts, thus giving the reader opportunity to greater understand the events and psychology that led up to a nightmarish Prom Night in a small town in Maine. ( )
1 vote KindleKapers | May 26, 2012 |
English (176)  French (3)  Portuguese (1)  Dutch (1)  Norwegian (1)  Spanish (1)  Romanian (1)  German (1)  All languages (185)
Showing 1-25 of 176 (next | show all)
Unfortunately I think this book suffers from being so well-known - I always expect there to be more plot than there is. But Carrie is a remarkable character in spite of it all, and I think the epistolary structure works pretty well. ( )
  jen.e.moore | Mar 26, 2016 |
I saw the movie a couple of years ago and I thought it was ok, nothing that special. Not even a really good horror movie. So I never bothered to read the books. Well, that was a mistake because the book is so much better than the movie…well, that’s a hardly surprising, movies are seldom better than the book. Carrie is not a horror book in its essence, yes it has elements of horror, but mostly the book is just a tragic tale of a girl who finally snaps, who after years of abuse, both at home and in school just finally just not going to take it anymore and she has power.

So she unleash Hell. Big Time!



( )
  MaraBlaise | Feb 9, 2016 |
I saw the movie a couple of years ago and I thought it was ok, nothing that special. Not even a really good horror movie. So I never bothered to read the books. Well, that was a mistake because the book is so much better than the movie…well, that’s a hardly surprising, movies are seldom better than the book. Carrie is not a horror book in its essence, yes it has elements of horror, but mostly the book is just a tragic tale of a girl who finally snaps, who after years of abuse, both at home and in school just finally just not going to take it anymore and she has power.

So she unleash Hell. Big Time!



( )
  | Feb 9, 2016 | edit |
Classic tale by Stephen King. A must read! ( )
  biggs1399 | Jan 19, 2016 |
Carrie White has always been the butt of jokes since she started elementary school. Once she hits puberty Carrie rediscovers that she is telekenetic. After a cruel trick is played onher at the school prom Carrie wreaks her vengeance. This book didn't really freak me out until the end bu Stephen King did a really good job of making people empathize with Carrie. Despite what she does she is the most likeable character in the book. ( )
  RachelNF | Jan 15, 2016 |
Audiobook performed by Sissy Spacek

Carrie White is the kid everyone picks on. Unsure and set apart by her mother’s extreme religious beliefs, she struggles to fit in with the high school crowd, but is taunted by everyone. Things begin to escalate when she has her first menstrual cycle while in gym class. Sue participates at first, but is ashamed of her behavior and, in an effort to atone and extend some kindness to Carrie, convinces her boyfriend, Tommy, to take the unpopular girl to the Senior Prom. This sets up the horrific tragedy to come.

I first read this back when it was a new book in 1974. I was fascinated and horrified. The movie, starring Sissy Spacek as Carrie, was excellent, and I have to admit that re-reading it now, I can’t help but picture images from the film.

I had forgotten King’s style in this novel – using a series of “quotes” from fictitious articles, news reports, etc interspersed throughout the work. It was not a problem as I was listening to the audio, but when I picked up the paperback to finish the last 70 or so pages that style seemed jarring to me.

Still, it’s a great story. King captures the reader’s attention immediately and builds the suspense throughout.

Sissy Spacek does a marvelous job performing the audio version. She is such a talented performer she made the story flow despite the style King used in this novel. Of course, Spacek performed the movie role, and is forever linked to this novel, so that added to the listening experience for me, even though not all of the novel is told in Carrie’s voice.
( )
  BookConcierge | Jan 14, 2016 |
Great book! A must read. ( )
  CrystalW | Dec 15, 2015 |
Great book! A must read. ( )
  CrystalW | Dec 15, 2015 |
My first S. King's novel and I really enjoyed it even though I knew the basics of the story. If this book was read by more high school kids, especially girls, maybe there would be less bullying in this world.
I really liked the newspaper articles and reports that happen after the Carrie incident that were mixed in together with the narrative. Those kind of tidbits give a novel some character.
Definite winner for me. I'm looking forward to reading more King in the future. ( )
  Jaskier | Dec 1, 2015 |
Not much more I can say about this book. It was heart-pumpingly good. I really got into it. It is an awesome horror novel. I'm glad I decided to read this one out of the other Stephen King books I've got on my list.
Oh and I think what made this more thrilling for me is that my senoir formal is on in like 3 weeks so the idea of everything going insane on that night is horrifying. I don't think I thought it through; reading this book now but anyways it is still an awesome book. I would probably read it again if I didn't have such a big list of books to read.

It was pretty imaginative that she could read peoples mind like at the end with Sue and going through her mind like file cabinets. That was an interesting tidbit.
I also thought her mother in the story was conveyed really well and added to the shock horror value of the book.

Although I didn't get scared, my heart started going crazy, like I was in the prom or feeling Carrie. It was intense but awesome. ( )
  ebethiepaige | Oct 17, 2015 |
Not much more I can say about this book. It was heart-pumpingly good. I really got into it. It is an awesome horror novel. I'm glad I decided to read this one out of the other Stephen King books I've got on my list.
Oh and I think what made this more thrilling for me is that my senoir formal is on in like 3 weeks so the idea of everything going insane on that night is horrifying. I don't think I thought it through; reading this book now but anyways it is still an awesome book. I would probably read it again if I didn't have such a big list of books to read.

It was pretty imaginative that she could read peoples mind like at the end with Sue and going through her mind like file cabinets. That was an interesting tidbit.
I also thought her mother in the story was conveyed really well and added to the shock horror value of the book.

Although I didn't get scared, my heart started going crazy, like I was in the prom or feeling Carrie. It was intense but awesome. ( )
  ebethiepaige | Oct 17, 2015 |
First published in 1974, Stephen King's debut novel Carrie is so much a part of a the popular landscape that it is hard to review.

Misfit teen Carrie is bullied both at home (by her religious-fanatic mother) and at school (by the so-called popular kids). Puberty, however, brings about the full flowering of her secret powers, the ability to move object with her mind (telekinesis, or TK). On prom night, after one final humiliation, Carrie has her revenge on them all.

A few months ago I read the Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson. Carrie White has much in common with Jackson's shy, bullied heroine Eleanor Vance. Both are isolated by domineering mothers, and both use their paranormal powers to release their all-encompassing anger (I believe that other commenters and even King himself have acknowledged the similarity between the two characters).

King chose an interesting method of storytelling with this book, including excerpts from fictitious articles and reports and even selections from a "memoir" by one of the supporting characters. I liked this book more than I thought I would, and would recommend it to the few who haven't read it yet. ( )
  akblanchard | Sep 22, 2015 |
Carrie by Stephen King (8/9/15)

I may be the very last reader in America, in the world even, to read Stephen King's first novel, [Carrie], this despite being one of the first few thousand to possess the book.

The plot is surely known to all; it was to me though I hadn't read the book (nor seen either of the film versions). Carrie White, 16, is the daughter of a widow obsessed with her wretched, extreme, pathological concept of sin and its consequences. Carrie is a virtual recluse, an outsider excluded from the social life at the high school she attends. She's the butt of every prank, joke, and jibe. Naturally, she's ignorant of sex and reproduction, and it's this ignorance that upends everything. Despite her privations, she's gifted with telekinetic powers, meaning she can move objects by thinking about moving the objects.

King frames the tale as a scientific report, with genetic mumbo-jumbo, citations from research papers, and testimony given before a government committee investigating the catastrophe triggered by high school social politics. He keeps the action moving; you know the denouement is going to be spectacular and bloody, with a high body count. And of course it is.

As you may know, King was teaching at a high school in Maine when Carrie was written. Frustrated by what he saw as his manuscript's shortcomings, he tossed it. His wife retrieved it and coaxed him to complete it. Doubleday accepted the book, paying King a $2,500 advance for the hardcover edition it published in 1974.

In April 1975, Signet published Carrie in mass-market paperback, releasing it with great hoopla during the American Bookseller's Convention in NYC. That's where I picked up my free copy; it is the copy I just read.
  weird_O | Aug 10, 2015 |
This is a book that can be read more than once and never gets old. ( )
  nevans1972 | Aug 6, 2015 |
This is a book that can be read more than once and never gets old. ( )
  nevans1972 | Aug 6, 2015 |
GREAT, SHOWS WHAT HAPPENS WHEN YOU PISS=OFF A SHY NERD. I'M WRITING THIS NOW IN 2015 SO I DON'T REMEMBER ALOT OF THE DETAILS. NOW I LOOK BACK AND THE BOOK SORT OF TELLS THE FUTURE IN A STRANGE WAY, NOT ABOUT HER POWERS BUT THE WAY PEOPLE TREAT HER. IN TODAY'S WORLD PEOPLE TREAT EACH OTHER THAT WAY NO MATTER WHAT. ( )
  Aleahmom | Jul 28, 2015 |
Great read! Carrie White is just a tragic figure. Bullied and belittled. And then - well the girl gets powers and then the girl gets revenge! It was really hard to feel anything but empathy for her, even when she goes insane. Especially with her horrible mother, one of the worst parents in literature of all time! I also like the way King interspersed other "first source" material throughout the story. Even though it gives away the ending, it does nothing to take away from the tale! But my overwhelming thought at the end was poor, poor Carrie... ( )
  Stahl-Ricco | Jul 12, 2015 |
I didn't care for the novel Carrie. I saw the movie a long time ago so I knew what it was about and I loved the movie so I thought I would like the book even more, but that didn't happen. I didn't like how the reader pretty much knows what's going to happen at the end before getting there. I don't like how there wasn't more detail between tele kinetics and menstruation. I liked how it change point of views in different characters and the build up to the end. I would of liked to seen all the aftermath from the characters, the interviews that were scattered around the story, at the end after everything happened, as well as the scientific explanations of tele kinetics because in the book it gives small examples then all of a sudden she has complete control over her power? Didn't make much sense. ( )
  GrlIntrrptdRdng | Jun 28, 2015 |
I didn't care for the novel Carrie. I saw the movie a long time ago so I knew what it was about and I loved the movie so I thought I would like the book even more, but that didn't happen. I didn't like how the reader pretty much knows what's going to happen at the end before getting there. I don't like how there wasn't more detail between tele kinetics and menstruation. I liked how it change point of views in different characters and the build up to the end. I would of liked to seen all the aftermath from the characters, the interviews that were scattered around the story, at the end after everything happened, as well as the scientific explanations of tele kinetics because in the book it gives small examples then all of a sudden she has complete control over her power? Didn't make much sense. ( )
  GrlIntrrptdRdng | Jun 28, 2015 |
wow, what a great read. I saw the original movie and, recently, the 2013 remake. yet, this book still fascinated me, if not for the story, then for the intricate way it gets presented to the reader.

through what is in fact a complex tangle of flashbacks, flash forwards, police reports, first person scenes, third person scenes, newspaper wires, autobiography excerpts, ... King manages to add another layer of suspension to an already thrilling story.

perhaps what I like so much about the well known story of Carrie is the sheer simpleness of it and the way that we can all relate to the main character's yearning for love, belonging and safety.

on a final note, I want to highlight that the book really adds much more significance to the story which the movies (or any movie in fact) ever could. so even if you have seen the movie(s), it's well worth the read.

this was my first Stephen King, but surely not my last! ( )
  bbbart | May 30, 2015 |
(spoiler alert)

I’ve never seen either the classic or remake films. Just not very good with on-screen gore. But of course I know (deep breath) that it’s a menstruation/female body horror featuring telekinetic teen Carrie going postal at her high school prom after being doused in buckets of blood by her bullying fellow pupils. Luckily Stephen King’s novel is constructed to be spoiler proof, revealing all its key elements right at the start while teasingly holding back on the detail. This is a master class in storytelling, braiding together the events leading up to the prom from the characters’ viewpoints with post incident reportage and survivor’s accounts. There’s huge pleasure in being granted the godlike status of always knowing more than both the doomed protagonists and those speculating on their actions and motives after the event. ( )
  Bernadette877 | Mar 22, 2015 |
Spoilers throughout. There are thousands of reviews of this book without spoilers. Find one.

I enjoyed this reread (#4, I believe, but I think I've lost count) far more than any of the other times I have read this book. I remember one read being as low as two stars for me. I detested this book. It bored me to death. But, this go around, I loved it.

If I didn't know any better, I would think that books change over time, or is that the reader?

I still don't like the ending. Meaning, the last few pages of the book. I feel that King should have stopped after Carrie died, and left the fate of the town to our imaginations, but that's my own opinion. Carrie's demise is so emotional that the final few pages of the book pale in comparison. We go from strong feelings of sadness to an author's attempt to wrap things up with a bow. Fuck that. If I'm to cry, leave me in tears.

I still have a fierce hatred for all the film adaptations of this book. None of them get the character of Carrie right (Carrie and her mother were BIG women, not the skinny wraiths that Hollywood demands), nor do they drive home the crushing tragedy of the narrative. Why hasn't anyone made a Carrie movie wherein Sue finds Carrie outside of the Cavalier? Why must the movies always finish in the White home? Whatever. Moving on.

This time, I noted several names that pop up with regularity throughout the King-verse, and one character from one of King's novellas. It's probably the best part about reading Stephen King's for me. He writes nearly constantly about small towns, and having all these Easter eggs hidden throughout his work makes it feel as if you're part of one of these small towns. Like everyone is a friend or neighbor. I dig that very much.

Notable names:
Hanscom (It)
Trelawney (Mr. Mercedes)
Mears ('Salem's Lot)
The Black Man (aka the Dark Man/Randall Flagg - the entire King-verse)

Notable characters:
Teddy Duchamps (The Body)

In summation: One down and thrity-three novels to go. Next up is 'Salem's Lot, which I am completely excited for. It's one of my all-time favorite King books, and it never fails to terrify. ( )
1 vote Edward.Lorn | Feb 13, 2015 |
Fantastic book! ( )
  VincentDarlage | Jan 30, 2015 |
Stephen Kingin ensimmäinen teos on helppolukuinen, eikä kauhean pelottava. Mielenkiitoinen näkökulma siihen, miten kiusaaminen vaikuttaa ihmiseen. ( )
  marintala | Dec 6, 2014 |
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