HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

A Different Kind of Forever by Dee Ernst
Loading...

A Different Kind of Forever

by Dee Ernst

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
194537,190 (3.5)None

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Showing 4 of 4
I picked this one up after seeing a positive review of it at Dear Author . This is an older woman/younger man story - Diane is 45, divorced and a mother of 3 teenage girls. Michael "Mickey Flynn" Carlucci is 26 and a rock star - singer/songwriter, keyboard and guitar player in the band NinetySeven. Michael was all but raised by his older sisters and in Diane he has found someone who finally compares favourably with them - his womanly ideal. I could certainly understand their attraction to each other, even if I did wonder occasionally how long it would last. But, as Michael himself says: “Forever, Diane. I will love you forever.” She looked at him. “Michael, think about what you’re saying. You and I will never grow old together. You know that. There is no forever with us.” “Of course there is,” he said softly. “We aren’t like everybody else, you and I. You know that. We’ll have a different kind of forever.” Michael and Diane have the sweetest meet cute that I have read in a long time - involving a big dog who loves pastrami. He falls for her pretyt much instantly even though she doesn't believe him really. Early in their relationship, she asks him how many times he's been in love. This is his response: He thought. “Three times. My first great love was Theresa Milano. She moved next door to us when I was in the third grade. She was in public school, and I was in Catholic school, but I was determined to make it work. I proposed to her half-way through the fourth grade, but she had become infatuated with a shortstop. She broke my heart. But we stayed friends. She’s an intern now, at Columbia Medical School. I still see her." “How sweet." “There was an actress. We dated for about a year. Then I stopped touring and we lived together for six months. All that togetherness was a big mistake.” He sipped more wine. “And then there was a week ago Tuesday.” *sigh* I did like Michael. A lot.In the end, Dabney and I give this the same grade, although I think we had different things we liked/disliked about it. I did notice some typos and grammatical errors and there were a couple of references which dated the book to an earlier work (as it says in the front). But, there was something so compelling about the passion and connection between Michael and Diane. I grade with my emotions, so it gets a B. I did wonder how they would be in 20 years, but Michael was quite right in point out that life is precarious and either of them could get sick, get hit by a bus etc, way before age became an issue - I could get with the idea of living for now and worrying about tomorrow when/if it comes but still - 19 years is a big gap. I was seriously worried toward the end (even though I knew there was a HEA) which says much about the writer's ability to suck me in. There is much unresolved at the end of the book and it has a very abrupt ending - like Dabney, I could have used an epilogue checking in in a year or so to round of my experience. www.kaetrinsmusings.blogspot.com ( )
  Kaetrin | Aug 13, 2012 |
I picked this one up after seeing a positive review of it at Dear Author . This is an older woman/younger man story - Diane is 45, divorced and a mother of 3 teenage girls. Michael "Mickey Flynn" Carlucci is 26 and a rock star - singer/songwriter, keyboard and guitar player in the band NinetySeven. Michael was all but raised by his older sisters and in Diane he has found someone who finally compares favourably with them - his womanly ideal. I could certainly understand their attraction to each other, even if I did wonder occasionally how long it would last. But, as Michael himself says: “Forever, Diane. I will love you forever.” She looked at him. “Michael, think about what you’re saying. You and I will never grow old together. You know that. There is no forever with us.” “Of course there is,” he said softly. “We aren’t like everybody else, you and I. You know that. We’ll have a different kind of forever.” Michael and Diane have the sweetest meet cute that I have read in a long time - involving a big dog who loves pastrami. He falls for her pretyt much instantly even though she doesn't believe him really. Early in their relationship, she asks him how many times he's been in love. This is his response: He thought. “Three times. My first great love was Theresa Milano. She moved next door to us when I was in the third grade. She was in public school, and I was in Catholic school, but I was determined to make it work. I proposed to her half-way through the fourth grade, but she had become infatuated with a shortstop. She broke my heart. But we stayed friends. She’s an intern now, at Columbia Medical School. I still see her." “How sweet." “There was an actress. We dated for about a year. Then I stopped touring and we lived together for six months. All that togetherness was a big mistake.” He sipped more wine. “And then there was a week ago Tuesday.” *sigh* I did like Michael. A lot.In the end, Dabney and I give this the same grade, although I think we had different things we liked/disliked about it. I did notice some typos and grammatical errors and there were a couple of references which dated the book to an earlier work (as it says in the front). But, there was something so compelling about the passion and connection between Michael and Diane. I grade with my emotions, so it gets a B. I did wonder how they would be in 20 years, but Michael was quite right in point out that life is precarious and either of them could get sick, get hit by a bus etc, way before age became an issue - I could get with the idea of living for now and worrying about tomorrow when/if it comes but still - 19 years is a big gap. I was seriously worried toward the end (even though I knew there was a HEA) which says much about the writer's ability to suck me in. There is much unresolved at the end of the book and it has a very abrupt ending - like Dabney, I could have used an epilogue checking in in a year or so to round of my experience. www.kaetrinsmusings.blogspot.com ( )
  Kaetrin | Aug 13, 2012 |
I picked this one up after seeing a positive review of it at Dear Author . This is an older woman/younger man story - Diane is 45, divorced and a mother of 3 teenage girls. Michael "Mickey Flynn" Carlucci is 26 and a rock star - singer/songwriter, keyboard and guitar player in the band NinetySeven. Michael was all but raised by his older sisters and in Diane he has found someone who finally compares favourably with them - his womanly ideal. I could certainly understand their attraction to each other, even if I did wonder occasionally how long it would last. But, as Michael himself says: “Forever, Diane. I will love you forever.” She looked at him. “Michael, think about what you’re saying. You and I will never grow old together. You know that. There is no forever with us.” “Of course there is,” he said softly. “We aren’t like everybody else, you and I. You know that. We’ll have a different kind of forever.” Michael and Diane have the sweetest meet cute that I have read in a long time - involving a big dog who loves pastrami. He falls for her pretyt much instantly even though she doesn't believe him really. Early in their relationship, she asks him how many times he's been in love. This is his response: He thought. “Three times. My first great love was Theresa Milano. She moved next door to us when I was in the third grade. She was in public school, and I was in Catholic school, but I was determined to make it work. I proposed to her half-way through the fourth grade, but she had become infatuated with a shortstop. She broke my heart. But we stayed friends. She’s an intern now, at Columbia Medical School. I still see her." “How sweet." “There was an actress. We dated for about a year. Then I stopped touring and we lived together for six months. All that togetherness was a big mistake.” He sipped more wine. “And then there was a week ago Tuesday.” *sigh* I did like Michael. A lot.In the end, Dabney and I give this the same grade, although I think we had different things we liked/disliked about it. I did notice some typos and grammatical errors and there were a couple of references which dated the book to an earlier work (as it says in the front). But, there was something so compelling about the passion and connection between Michael and Diane. I grade with my emotions, so it gets a B. I did wonder how they would be in 20 years, but Michael was quite right in point out that life is precarious and either of them could get sick, get hit by a bus etc, way before age became an issue - I could get with the idea of living for now and worrying about tomorrow when/if it comes but still - 19 years is a big gap. I was seriously worried toward the end (even though I knew there was a HEA) which says much about the writer's ability to suck me in. There is much unresolved at the end of the book and it has a very abrupt ending - like Dabney, I could have used an epilogue checking in in a year or so to round of my experience. www.kaetrinsmusings.blogspot.com ( )
  Kaetrin | Aug 9, 2012 |
I really liked the hero and heroine in the story. The unexpected couple who fall love always strikes a chord with me and who better to fall in love with than a rock star. There were some emotional moments that really had me going through the motions along with the characters. Some humor and some steamy love scenes. A great book! ( )
  LiteraryChanteuse | Apr 7, 2012 |
Showing 4 of 4
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

Michael Carlucci, the hot, young musical genius behind the successful rock band, NinetySeven, knows that he's found the woman for him. Diane Matthews isn't just beautiful and smart, she's got an infectious passion for everything in her life, from her three daughters to her new play. For Diane, it's not as simple. She's almost twenty years older than Michael. She's not interested in remarrying, she's very happy with her life just the way it is, thank you very much. But she can't deny the growing attraction between them, and it's not just his touch that she craves. But it's not until Michael is gone and an old love returns that she realizes just what he meant to her. He said he would love her forever. Can she trust that?… (more)

LibraryThing Author

Dee Ernst is a LibraryThing Author, an author who lists their personal library on LibraryThing.

profile page | author page

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
1 wanted

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.5)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3
3.5
4 3
4.5
5

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 119,589,020 books! | Top bar: Always visible