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Breathing Underwater by Alex Flinn
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Breathing Underwater (original 2000; edition 2002)

by Alex Flinn

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551None18,115 (3.87)6
Member:Tasses
Title:Breathing Underwater
Authors:Alex Flinn
Info:HarperTeen (2002), Paperback, 272 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:***
Tags:Young Adult

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Breathing Underwater by Alex Flinn (2000)

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Showing 1-5 of 36 (next | show all)
I was not crazy about this book. The narrator is a jerk and is supposed to be. I'm not sure I buy his miraculous epiphany. Recommended for teens wants an angsty, realistic fiction read in the vein of Ellen Hopkins. ( )
  LaneLiterati | Mar 15, 2014 |
This novel precedes Diva although I did not know that when I read either of them. In my opinion this story is better and more in depth into Nick's character than Diva was into Caitlyn's. I like the way we learned about Nick and his point of view through his journal. ( )
  ABShepherd | May 15, 2013 |
Nick Andreas is a 16 year old boy that pretends to have a perfect life and he doesn't tell anyone about how his real life is until he meets Caitlin. Nick fall in love with Caitlin and doesn't want to lose her but because of all the trouble and the abuse that he suffers in his house he ends losing her. Now Nick has to attend an anger management class where he finally understands that what he did to Caitlin was wrong.
I believe this book has a lot of potential in a class. This book can help teacher introduce concerns such as family violence, unhealthy relationships, and bullying. I think that the book touches in all this subjects that can be of interest to the students, especially to the ones that might be going through this situation.
I can honestly say that I really liked this book because there is a lot to learn from it. This is the first book that I read from a guy’s perspective which I found very interesting. I do believe that students can learn a lot from it. The one thing that I didn't really like was the ending; I think it should have ended differently. ( )
  MagdaAju | Apr 15, 2013 |
A winner with my students. ( )
  KimKimpton | Nov 6, 2012 |
I really enjoyed this book. It really was written very well. I would definitely recommend reading this. ( )
  HollyRae | Feb 2, 2012 |
Showing 1-5 of 36 (next | show all)
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I've never been in a courthouse before.
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0064472574, Paperback)

It was only a slap. Well, maybe more than one. And maybe Nick used his fist at the end when the anger got out of control. But his girlfriend Caitlin deserved it--hadn't she defied him by singing in the school talent show when he had forbidden her to display herself like that? Even though he'd told her that everybody would laugh at her because she couldn't sing and was a fat slob? Both were lies. Because Caitlin was so beautiful, the only person who understood him. Out of his desperate need for her came all the mean words and the hitting. But now Caitlin's family has procured a restraining order to keep Nick away, and the judge has sentenced him to Mario Ortega's Family Violence class, to sit around every week with six other angry guys who hit their girlfriends. And to write a journal explaining how he got into this mess.

Other teen novels--most strikingly Dreamland by Sarah Dessen--have shown dating violence from the point of view of a young girl trapped in an abusive relationship, but in Breathing Underwater, first-time novelist Alex Flinn tackles the difficult task of making us understand, if not sympathize with, the motivation of a violent young man. The story, like Rob Thomas's stylistically similar Rats Saw God, proceeds in two different time frames: the journal in which Nick relives the course of his tender but stormy love affair with Caitlin and the time after the restraining order, in which a desperate and friendless Nick struggles to understand and overcome his anger. This extraordinarily moving novel is highly relevant reading for all young men in our violence-prone society. (Ages 13 and older) --Patty Campbell

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:30:21 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

Sent to counseling for hitting his girlfriend, Caitlin, and ordered to keep a journal, sixteen-year-old Nick recounts his relationship with Caitlin, examines his controlling behavior and anger, and describes living with his abusive father.

(summary from another edition)

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