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The Diary of Pelly D by L. J. Adlington
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The Diary of Pelly D

by L. J. Adlington

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Showing 1-5 of 16 (next | show all)
The voice just wasn't there for me. And when you're writing in a Dear Diary style the voice has to be nailed. Plus is was hard shifting back and forth from 3rd person and the 1st person diary. Meh. It's the new whatever. ( )
  akmargie | Apr 4, 2013 |
The Diary of Pelly D alternates between the story of Toni V, who is part of a crew rebuilding the destroyed City Five, and Pelly D, who left behind a diary of her life before and during the war that destroyed it. Toni V finds Pelly D's diary buried in the ground and begins to read it.

I read this book having already read Cherry Heaven. I mostly decided to read this in order to understand what happened in this world before the events of Cherry Heaven. Knowing about the three genetic groups that everyone is assigned to one of, I could guess from the beginning that Pelly D would be placed into the lowest group.

I did think that this book provided a nice backstory for Cherry Heaven (even though I know this one is meant to be read first), which I think is better than this book. I found it interesting to see the better parts of Pelly D's character come out as her situation worsens, and I thought that Toni V's opinions on what was going on added something extra to the story.

I will admit that the story was fairly predictable from a certain point, but it was still a fine read. ( )
  dste | Oct 18, 2010 |
I tried to read this book a few years ago, but couldn't seem to get past the first couple of pages. Once again, this was a difficult book for me to get into. It took me at least a day and a half to read the first thiry pages or so. After I was into it, it became an easier read because I was curious to see what happened to Pelly D. and Toni V. Adlington created a new world for her readers, but failed to establish it. She threw out some hints here and there for the reader to pick up, but it was still hard to create an overall picture in my mind of the setting of this story. The Toni V. intervals of the books also bothered me because it really disturbed me that these people were still submitting themselves to the brainwashing and the "rules and regulations" of the Hitler figure of the novel. It bothered me because I think that Adlington intended to write a resonating story, but it ended up sounding like a preachy "warning to mankind" kind of story. And speaking of Hitler, if it wouldn't have been for a few name and setting changes here and there, this is the exact story of the Holocaust everyone is familiar with. This is fine, but the names and setting of the novel aren't enough to make it a unique, original piece. Overall, this book was just "okay," and I probably won't pick it up to read it again. ( )
  jessilouwho22 | Jul 28, 2010 |
A stand alone YA book. A very good read. I like Toni V and the way he felt drawn to read the journal. It was an interesting look on dystopia. ( )
  viciouslittlething | Jul 7, 2010 |
This book is about a guy named Toni V. and his life on a construction site that is repairing City Five. He finds a diary while digging, but instead of turning it in to the Supervisor and following the rules and regs, he keeps the diary and reads it. It's the diary of Pelly D. He learns about her perfect life before the war and how it takes a turn for the worse. The gene factor becomes a problem as the As try to take over and excile the Gs. Toni V. tries to coop with the facts that are given in the diary while trying staying to stay in his right mind in his world after the war.
  DF5b_aniysat | Jan 4, 2010 |
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In Memory of Justin Tobias Berry
1971-2003

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When the dust settled, Toni V took his goggles off for a moment and rubbed his eyes.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0060766158, Hardcover)

This is the diary of Pelly D. It,s totally secret, so if you are reading it I hate you already.

The notebook is wrapped in faded brown paper, sealed in a battered water can. Toni V, who works on the City Five demolition crew, unearths it as he's drilling through concrete. He shouldn't smuggle it back to his room, and he definitely shouldn't read it. But he does. At first, Toni V thinks Pelly D is rich, stupid, and petty. Yet he can't help starting to care for her, especially as she begins to write about the gene tagging, the bombs, and the fighting. Her words slowly reveal the chilling state of her world. What happened to Pelly D? Toni V needs to know. He has only one clue:

Dig—dig everywhere.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:18:47 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

When Toni V, a construction worker on a futuristic colony, finds the diary of a teenage girl whose life has been turned upside-down by holocaust-like events, he begins to question his own beliefs.

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