HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Happy Holidays! The 12 Days of LT scavenger hunt is going on. Can you solve the clues?
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Don't Tell Mum I Work on the Rigs, She…
Loading...

Don't Tell Mum I Work on the Rigs, She Thinks I'm a Piano Player in a… (2005)

by Paul Carter

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2411169,296 (3.47)12

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 12 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 11 (next | show all)
Great fun. A rip-roaring ride through the world of exploratory oil well drilling that maybe doesn't score many points on the "great literature" scale but is likely to have you laughing out loud on numerous occasions. ( )
  expatscot | Dec 19, 2016 |
I read this book while on a flight a few weeks ago. Its surprisingly readable and relatively short -- you can knock it over in a single long haul flight. The book covers the memoirs of an oil rig worker, from childhood right through to middle age. That's probably the biggest weakness of the book, it just kind of stops when the writer reaches the present day. I felt there wasn't really a conclusion, which was disappointing.

An interesting fun read however.

http://www.stillhq.com/book/Paul_Carter/Dont_Tell_Mum_I_Work_On_The_Rigs.html ( )
  mikal | Aug 21, 2014 |
Entertaining, although he lays into Nigeria in a thoroughly unsympathetic way. As another reviewer said, a good way to vicariously experience the rough edges of the world. ( )
1 vote seabear | Jan 9, 2013 |
I have not laughed out loud so much reading a book as I did with this hilarious collection of stories! Some of them just total gross outs, some sad, but mostly very funny. Paul Carter certainly has a gift for comedy! What a life - I can't imagine how hard that type of work is and even more so some of the places he worked in. Pretty scary stuff! I thoroughly enjoyed it and look forward to reading his other books. ( )
1 vote clamato | Nov 11, 2012 |
After trudging through an allusive and whimsical fictional rite-of-passage marathon from Haruki Murakami, Paul Carter's real-life lad's progress is a welcome breath of foul air. The surprise, and the reason I didn't give it more stars, is that there's not a lot about life on the rigs as such, no real background on the topic or technical info, but simply a chronological succession of anecdotes from his life, much of which was indeed spent on rigs around the world. As a mild-mannered and timid librarian I derived a vicarious thrill from these tales, and though a couple sounded to me like urban legends, the rest were as hilarious/appalling as you'd expect. Carter can write sharply and very amusingly too. A darn good read. ( )
1 vote sagitprop | May 13, 2012 |
Showing 1-5 of 11 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
I was born in the UK to a German mother, an English father, an older sister, and a cat called Brim.
Quotations
CALENTURE--- A name formerly given to a tropical fever or delirium suffered by sailors after long periods at sea, who imagine the ocean to be green fields and desire to leap into them.
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

A 'take no prisoners' approach to life has seen Paul Carter heading to some of the world's most remote, wild and dangerous places as a contractor in the oil business. Amazingly, he's survived (so far) to tell these stories from the edge of civilization, and reason.… (more)

» see all 3 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.47)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 5
2.5 5
3 19
3.5 5
4 22
4.5 1
5 7

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 130,821,860 books! | Top bar: Always visible