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Rootless by Chris Howard
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Rootless (edition 2012)

by Chris Howard

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10511114,970 (3.74)1
Member:usagijihen
Title:Rootless
Authors:Chris Howard
Info:Scholastic Inc. (2012), Hardcover, 336 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
Tags:best of 2012, own, arc, signed

Work details

Rootless by Chris Howard

  1. 00
    Ship Breaker by Paolo Bacigalupi (wifilibrarian)
    wifilibrarian: Rootless shares several themes and settings with Ship Breaker. Both stories have teen male protagonists with family issues, and both stories are set in future worlds where the environment has collapsed due to human interference. Both include the setting of a future dystopian/post-apocalyptic New Orleans.… (more)
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Showing 1-5 of 11 (next | show all)
In this post-apocalyptic, dystopian book we follow Banyan who is a tree builder. In the now desolate landscape trees do not grow, locusts eat everything in sight (including people), and GenTech genetically engineers the only edible food. Banyan uses recycled scrap metal and parts to create shrubs and trees that move and glow so the wealthy people can remember the world that once existed. While on a job Banyan comes in contact with a photo of his missing father sitting among “real” trees. Now, Banyan is on a search for his father and the Promised Land. On his way he will come into contact with friends and enemies, including poachers, pirates, and GenTech agents.

I liked Banyan’s character and the world building in this book, which was brought to life by trees that Banyan so lovingly created. The book went in a more science fiction direction then I expected, which didn’t detract from the book, but made it a little hard to follow as we got deeper into the GenTech world and the genetic engineering. I loved Alpha’s character; she was a pirate that reminded me of Tank Girl with her Mohawk and no-nonsense attitude surviving in a deserted wasteland. I wanted more Alpha and her relationship with Banyan. I flew through this book and will probably read the sequel. This was a good addition to the flooded dystopian market. ( )
  clockwork_serenity | Jan 23, 2016 |
In this post-apocalyptic, dystopian book we follow Banyan who is a tree builder. In the now desolate landscape trees do not grow, locusts eat everything in sight (including people), and GenTech genetically engineers the only edible food. Banyan uses recycled scrap metal and parts to create shrubs and trees that move and glow so the wealthy people can remember the world that once existed. While on a job Banyan comes in contact with a photo of his missing father sitting among “real” trees. Now, Banyan is on a search for his father and the Promised Land. On his way he will come into contact with friends and enemies, including poachers, pirates, and GenTech agents.

I liked Banyan’s character and the world building in this book, which was brought to life by trees that Banyan so lovingly created. The book went in a more science fiction direction then I expected, which didn’t detract from the book, but made it a little hard to follow as we got deeper into the GenTech world and the genetic engineering. I loved Alpha’s character; she was a pirate that reminded me of Tank Girl with her Mohawk and no-nonsense attitude surviving in a deserted wasteland. I wanted more Alpha and her relationship with Banyan. I flew through this book and will probably read the sequel. This was a good addition to the flooded dystopian market. ( )
  clockwork_serenity | Jan 23, 2016 |
In this dystopian novel every single tree has been cut down, leaving a world filled with dust storms, no wildlife, and no source of food other than popcorn. GenTech, a rich corporation, controls the growing, buying and selling of corn killing anyone who dares grow or steal their corn.

Read the rest of my review at: http://shouldireaditornot.wordpress.com/2012/11/18/rootless-chris-howard/ ( )
  ShouldIReadIt | Sep 26, 2014 |
When I read the premise of this book and read about the map on the woman's body, I immediately thought of the movie, "Waterworld". The story is well written and carries you along at a steady pace. The characters are well defined. The author has done a great job of giving you one perspective of a character only to throw something in the main character's path that makes you look at the character again and re-think your feelings. I have read several books over the last year that are of the dystopian type that shows to what extent people will go to control society when things go wrong. Banyan was hired by a man named Frost to build trees on his property. The trees are made from scrap metal and lights. It is the closest thing they have to a vision of real trees. When Banyan meets the young girl who lives in the house with her mother, Frost and his son he learns from an item she has that his father may not be dead after all. His journey to find his father leads him to learn that all that he has been told is not necessarily what is true. When they mentioned the trash island he is taken to I immediately thought of the research some of our students did last year for our environmental unit. The researched "The Great Pacific Garbage Patch". I wondered if this was the inspiration for the trash island. This was a really great book. The use of the words "damn" and "hell" were the only two curse words in the book. I would suggest this book be read by 8th grade and above as it talks about the boys feelings toward a girl. There is nothing lewd in the book. It is just him mentioning his feelings of desire. unfortunately I hear this daily as I walk behind kids at school. That doesn't mean I want to hear it or condone it. It is however a fact of life that kids this age have raging hormones that we as adults try to keep a lid on. That is the only reason I would recommend it for the upper middle school or high school student. This is an author I had not heard of before and one I will definitely look forward to reading in the future, especially since this was just the first book in the series. ( )
  skstiles612 | Jan 27, 2014 |
Enjoyed this book even with what I felt were plot holes. What I thought made up for this was that Banyan, the protagonist, and the first person narrator was so likable, and a surprisingly well developed moral compass considering the violent world in which he lived in. IT made it easy to like the story he told about his life building artificial trees in a world where no more natural trees exist due to GenTec's, an evil corporation, genetic engineering of pest resistant crops which resulted in super bugs that ate everything else on the planet. Banyan soon sets out on a quest to find his missing father, who left him, while also trying to find a (sadly) semi-mythical place where trees might still grow. ( )
  wifilibrarian | Apr 28, 2013 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0545387892, Hardcover)

17-year-old Banyan is a tree builder. Using salvaged scrap metal, he creates forests for rich patrons who seek a reprieve from the desolate landscape. Although Banyan's never seen a real tree--they were destroyed more than a century ago--his missing father used to tell him stories about the Old World.

Everything changes when Banyan meets a mysterious woman with a strange tattoo
--a map to the last living trees on earth, and he sets off across a wasteland from which few return. Those who make it past the pirates and poachers can't escape the locusts . . . the locusts that now feed on human flesh.

But Banyan isn't the only one looking for the trees, and he's running out of time. Unsure of whom to trust, he's forced to make an alliance with Alpha, an alluring, dangerous pirate with an agenda of her own. As they race towards a promised land that might only be a myth, Banyan makes shocking discoveries about his family, his past, and how far people will go to bring back the trees.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:04:05 -0400)

In a world devastated by war and disease, a young tree builder searches for the last trees on earth.

(summary from another edition)

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