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Privacy (Big Ideas//Small Books) by Garret…
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Privacy (Big Ideas//Small Books)

by Garret Keizer

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My main take away from this was that you don't have to take sides, exactly, between (a) a world in which we keep most personal information to ourselves and (b) a world in which we share personal information. If you're in the A camp, you can get labeled a Luddite or a Victorian. If you're in the B camp you might be considered part of a narcissistic culture. But the real issue is being able to choose whether you want to want to divulge personal information or not. You might want to talk openly about one part of your life but not another. He comes back to the class issue a lot - that wealthy people have the means to ensure their privacy; others don't. And I thought his argument that privacy may not be as culturally relative as people think was valid. ( )
  kgib | Mar 31, 2013 |
All this is provocative, and it is offered as a series of aperçus about privacy that readers may find amusing or glib according to taste. ... But the book doesn't add up to "as thorough an introduction as possible to the big idea of privacy" that Keizer promises at the outset.
 
I’m not sure Keizer successfully demonstrates the compatibility of privacy and "from each according to his abilities, to each according to his need." ... Yet I’m entirely convinced by Keizer’s argument that a society that doesn’t value our personal privacy cannot plausibly claim to value our humanity. This may be a far bigger conundrum than one slender book can solve, but “Privacy” is a step in the right direction.
added by lquilter | editSalon.com, Laura Miller (Aug 5, 2012)
 
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0312554842, Paperback)

American essayist and Harper’s contributing editor Garret Keizer offers a brilliant, literate look at our strip-searched, over-shared, viral-videoed existence.

Body scans at the airport, candid pics on Facebook, a Twitter account for your stray thoughts, and a surveillance camera on every street corner -- today we have an audience for all of the extraordinary and banal events of our lives. The threshold between privacy and exposure becomes more permeable by the minute. But what happens to our private selves when we cannot escape scrutiny, and to our public personas when they pass from our control?

In this wide-ranging, penetrating addition to the Big Ideas//Small Books series, and in his own unmistakable voice, Garret Keizer considers the moral dimensions of privacy in relation to issues of social justice, economic inequality, and the increasing commoditization of the global marketplace. Though acutely aware of the digital threat to privacy rights, Keizer refuses to see privacy in purely technological terms or as an essentially legalistic value. Instead, he locates privacy in the human capacity for resistance and in the sustainable society "with liberty and justice for all."

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 14:03:48 -0400)

"Body scans at the airport, candid pics on Facebook, a Twitter account for your stray thoughts, and a surveillance camera on every street corner--today we have an audience for all of the extraordinary and banal events of our lives. The threshold between privacy and exposure becomes more permeable by the minute. But what happens to our private selves when we cannot escape scrutiny, and to our public personas when they pass from our control? In this wide-ranging, penetrating addition to the Big Ideas//Small Books series, and in his own unmistakable voice, Garret Keizer considers the moral dimensions of privacy in relation to issues of social justice, economic inequality, and the increasing commoditization of the global marketplace. Though acutely aware of the digital threat to privacy rights, Keizer refuses to see privacy in purely technological terms or as an essentially legalistic value. Instead, he locates privacy in the human capacity for resistance and in the sustainable society 'with liberty and justice for all.'"--from cover, p. [2]… (more)

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