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Boy Kills Man by Matt Whyman
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Boy Kills Man

by Matt Whyman

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This book has non-stop action. The title name and cover art made it appealing to read. AHS/TB

It is action packed and it has a lot of drug dealing. A friend recommended it. AHS/DM
  edspicer | Nov 19, 2009 |
Sonny, a Columbian teen, is caught in dire poverty until he begins to work as a gun for with El Fantasma, a drug lord. Watching the downward spiral of this once likable young man is wrenching, even more so because it could so easily be true. ( )
  Elishibai | Aug 5, 2007 |
Alberto and Sonny are also caught in a war, this one run by Colombian drug cartels in Matt Whyman's Boy Kills Man (HarperCollins, 2005). Twelve-year-old dropouts living in the slums of Medellín, enthralled by soccer and machismo, are recruited by drug lord El Fantasma as assassins. "Believe me, nothing is more unsettling in this world than a kid with a gun," he says of them.
(Bring It On Home. By: Burner, Joyce Adams, School Library Journal, 03628930, Spring2007 Curriculum Connections, Vol. 53).
( )
  montereyhat | Jun 27, 2007 |
Sonny, aka Shorty, hasn't been in a classroom in years, and he spends his days doing odd jobs on the dangerous streets of Medellín, Colombia, South America. He and his best friend Alberto have a regular gig running cigarettes for a convenience-store owner, and in this line of work Alberto meets El Fantasma, a soft-spoken crime leader with a reputation for being merciless.

Soon after Alberto starts spending time away from Sonny, he shows up with a gun and fifty American dollars. Sonny knows Alberto is involved with something illegal, but rather than try to stop Alberto, he's intrigued with his friend's new secrecy and possessions. After all, the criminals in Medellín have better lives than everyone else. They have money and power and they know they're in control. Sonny, following Alberto's lead, convinces El Fantasma to take him on as an employee, specifically an assassin. What he doesn't know is that El Fantasma sees him as nothing more than a disposable object.

Don't be fooled by the title and setting of this book. Even though Sonny lives in poverty, abuse and violence, he is not a violent or evil person. In fact, he cares greatly for his friends and takes the assassin job because he believes it will help him support his mother. Matt Whyman doesn't beat the reader over the head with morality and lessons, either. Instead, he lets Sonny, a basically good kid who does the wrong thing for what he believes is the right reason, speak for himself.

BOY KILLS MAN is inspired by the true story of child assassins in Colombia.

--- Reviewed by Carlie Webber at http://www.teenreads.com/ ( )
  sharon58 | May 1, 2007 |
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Two thirteen-year-old boys, blood brothers and best friends, get drawn into a dangerous, violent world on the streets of a troubled Columbian city.

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