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The Seed Underground: A Growing Revolution to Save Food (original 2012; edition 2012)

by Janisse Ray

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341329,500 (3.63)None
Member:JonathanGorman
Title:The Seed Underground: A Growing Revolution to Save Food
Authors:Janisse Ray
Info:Chelsea Green Publishing (2012), Paperback, 240 pages
Collections:Read but unowned
Rating:***1/2
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The Seed Underground: A Growing Revolution to Save Food by Janisse Ray (Author) (2012)

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I'm torn here. I want to like this book, but must confess that I found something about the tone of the writer grating. There's something I can't quite put my finger on. The closest I can come is a sense of haughtiness, or perhaps a feeling the author is trying too hard in places to come off as sage and wise. I'm sympathetic to many of the authors leaning, but not necessarily all. (I'm not a fan of the huge internationals and I detest whati is happening with the law and genetic patents.) That being said, she doesn't send as much time talking about some of the things I'd rather hear about, such as the seed exchanges, setting up exchanges of knowledge, or multicropping. (Indeed, the latter gets less time than the discussion of it in the Unprejudiced Palate, a book that covers a much broader spectrum.

There's a lot that remains unsaid about a large, large chunk of the author's personal history. (Essentially, the raising of her son). I can respect in some ways that there's things she rather not talk about, but the fact they linger in the back of my mind and make me wonder exactly how much I can trust the persona that is being put through in the pages.

I feel compelled to say some positive things, since I really am conflicted. Some of the stories feel genuine and many of the resources are mentioned are interesting. I'm planning on working through some of the bibliography in the back to learn more. I suspect were I to meet the author in person, I'd get along with her. I feel that this book will deeply resonate with some audiences, but I'm not it. ( )
  JonathanGorman | Dec 5, 2012 |
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Discusses the loss of fruit and vegetable varieties and the genetically modified industrial monocultures being used today, shares the author's personal experiences growing, saving, and swapping seeds, and deconstructs the politics and genetics of seeds.… (more)

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