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Day of the False King by the dread pirate…
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Day of the False King

by the dread pirate Brad Geagley

More o't' same stuff: Semerket Series (Book 2)

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511229,653 (3.86)9
  1. Year of the Hyenas by the scurvy dog Brad Geagley (2005)
  2. A Vile Justice by the scurvy dog Lauren Haney (1999)
  3. The Poisoner of Ptah by the scurvy dog P.C. Doherty (2007)
  4. Demon of the Air by the scurvy dog Simon Levack (2004)
  5. The Assassins of Isis by the scurvy dog Paul Doherty (2004)
  1. The Slayers of Seth by the scurvy dog P.C. Doherty (2001)
  2. A Face Turned Backward by the scurvy dog Lauren Haney (1999)
  3. Slayer of Gods by the scurvy dog Lynda S. Robinson (2000)
  4. Murder in the Place of Anubis by the scurvy dog Lynda S. Robinson (1994)
  5. A Death in the Venetian Quarter by the scurvy dog Alan Gordon (2002)

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I read the historical mystery, Day of the False King, by Brad Geagley. Probably should say devoured. It was very good, even better than the first one. The main core of characters were also in this book. The ancient setting of Babylon was done even better than Thebes in Egypt. A very pleasant surprise. This author will go on my watch list.

The setting this time was Babylon and Semerket the main POV was sent there as a diplomat from Pharaoh with several jobs. Some official and public, some official and private, and some personal and private. It was very well done, and had many new and interesting characters. There were several story threads but they all meshed together so that there was one narrative but many things going on.

The only criticism was the parts to the mystery were obvious. All the big events were foreshadowed, and it basically gave the mystery away. Not that the foreshadowing was badly done, but perhaps things matched up too neatly, or the lack of real red herrings. Anyway it didn't really bother me, because I read the books for the historical details, and not so much for the mystery. ( )
  FicusFan | Dec 23, 2006 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0743250818, Hardcover)

"Another brilliant and out-of-the-ordinary murder mystery by the author of" Year of the Hyenas, " with an unusual and interesting detective, this time trying to pursue and rescue his own ex-wife, sold into slavery in the city of Babylon (in modern times, near Baghdad) at a time of violence and great danger, much like today."

"Day of the False King" continues the story of Semerket, Egypt's Clerk of Investigations and Secrets. The time is approximately 1150 B.C., and the conspirators who plotted the overthrow of Pharaoh Ramses III have been tried and executed. But the old pharaoh has succumbed to the wounds inflicted by his Theban wife, Queen Tiya; it is his first-born son who now rules Egypt as his chosen successor, Ramses IV.

Geographically placed at the center of the Old World, where East literally meets West, Babylon has forever been the crossroads for conquering armies and adventuresome merchants, and the prize of dynasts. From cruel tyrants to far-seeing visionaries, an ever-changing set of rulers have claimed Babylon's throne as their own. But they were not god-kings as in Egypt; in fact, there was no term for "king" in any of the Babylonian languages. Instead, they were called simply "Strong Man" or "Big Man." Then as now, only martial strength determined who ruled. Strangely, or perhaps inevitably, the rights of the individual were first codified and set down as laws here.

Around the time that "Day of the False King" takes place, the Middle East is undergoing -- just as it is today -- a tortuous, protracted transformation. The old regimes have vanished, setting the stage for the aggressive emergence of the new nations of Phoenicia, Israel, and Philistia; it is the fourth of these new peoples, the Assyrians, who will achieve dominance in the years ahead.Babylonia in particular has suffered a series of cataclysms. The old Kassite Dynasty, themselves invaders from the north, has been toppled. The nation of Elam (soon to be known as Persia) has launched a massive war to conquer Babylonia from the southeast. Native tribes in the country also see this moment as their own chance to evict the foreigners and re-establish a dynasty of their own.

Into this roiling alchemy, Semerket's adored ex-wife, Naia, is thrust. She and Rami, the tomb-maker's son, have been banished to Babylon as indentured servants -- punishment for their accidental roles in the Harem Conspiracy against Ramses III.

As in "Year of the Hyenas," most of the events and characters in "Day of the False King" are drawn from history. The Elamite invader King Kutir and the native-born Marduk truly vied for the throne of Babylonia. There really was a festival called "Day of the False King," when the entire world turned upside down for a day, when slaves ruled as masters, when the most foolish man in Babylon was chosen to become king. Semerket the detective is plunged into the midst of these events in pursuit of his own goals: to serve his Pharaoh and to find the woman he loves.

(raided from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:17:59 -0400)

"Day of the False King continues the story of Semerket, Egypt's Clerk of Investigations and Secrets. The time is approximately 1150 B.C., and the conspirators who plotted the overthrow of Pharaoh Ramses III have been tried and executed. But the old pharaoh has succumbed to the wounds inflicted by his Theban wife, Queen Tiya; it is his firstborn son who now rules Egypt as his chosen successor, Ramses IV." "Geographically placed at the center of the old world, where East literally meets West, Babylon has forever been the crossroads for conquering armies and adventuresome merchants, and the prize of dynasts. From cruel tyrants to far-seeing visionaries, an ever-changing set of rulers have claimed Babylon's throne as their own. But they were not god-kings as in Egypt; in fact, there was no term for "king" in any of the Babylon's languages. Instead, they were called simply "Strong Man" or "Big Man." Then as now, only martial strength determined who ruled. Strangely, or perhaps inevitably, the rights of the individual were first codified and set down as laws here." "Around the time that Day of the False King takes place, the Middle East is undergoing - just as it is today - a tortuous, protracted transformation. The old regimes have vanished, setting the stage for the aggressive emergence of the new nations of Phoenicia, Israel, and Philistia; it is the fourth of these new peoples, the Assyrians, who will achieve dominance in the years ahead." "Babylonia in particular has suffered a series of cataclysms. The old Kassite Dynasty, themselves invaders from the north, has been toppled. The nation of Elam (soon to be known as Persia) has launched a massive war to conquer Babylonia from the southeast. Native tribes in the country also see this moment as their own chance to evict the foreigners and re-establish a dynasty of their own." "Into this roiling alchemy, Semerket's adored ex-wife, Naia, is thrust. She and Rami, the tomb-maker's son, have been banished to Babylon as indentured servants - punishment for their accidental roles in the Harem Conspiracy against Ramses III." "As in Year of the Hyenas, most of the events and characters in Day of the False King are drawn from history. The Elamite invader King Kutir and the native-born Marduk truly vied for the throne of Babylonia. There really was a festival called Day of the False King, when the entire world turned upside down for a day, when slaves ruled as masters, when the most foolish man in Babylon was chosen to become king. Semerket the detective is plunged into the midst of these events in pursuit of his own goals: to serve his Pharaoh and to find the woman he loves."--BOOK JACKET.… (more!)

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