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Princeless: Save Yourself by Jeremy Whitley
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Princeless: Save Yourself

by Jeremy Whitley, Mia Goodwin (Illustrator)

Other authors: D. E. Belton (Illustrator)

Series: Princeless (Volume 1)

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» See also 2 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
This series had been recommended at Book Riot Live as a great book to give kids as a part of advancing We Need Diverse Books. I'd had an eye out for it ever since, looking for it at book stores but never finding it. I finally got around to putting it on my hold list at the library.

Adrienne is a fun, fierce protagonist, even if she sometimes feels like a paper doll made of "rah, rah, girl power!" But I like her relationship with her dragon, and when she meets Bedelia, the blacksmith's daughter, there is a fantastic bit about women's armor. It's almost too much that Adrienne's brother is weak and weepy, but since it's mentioned that this is a change that has come on in the last month, I'm sure there will be a story behind it in time.

When I remind myself both that this is a book intended for middle-grade readers and that this first volume has a lot of world building and character establishment to do, I'm pretty happy with it. I also find it interesting that while the ruling family is black, the only acknowledgement of racism in the book world is some anti-dwarf sentiment. I'm hoping he goes somewhere interesting with that.

Promising enough that I bought a copy for Jefferson's classroom for my We Need Diverse Books challenge. And bought volumes 2&3 for Jefferson. ( )
  greeniezona | Dec 6, 2017 |
This series had been recommended at Book Riot Live as a great book to give kids as a part of advancing We Need Diverse Books. I'd had an eye out for it ever since, looking for it at book stores but never finding it. I finally got around to putting it on my hold list at the library.

Adrienne is a fun, fierce protagonist, even if she sometimes feels like a paper doll made of "rah, rah, girl power!" But I like her relationship with her dragon, and when she meets Bedelia, the blacksmith's daughter, there is a fantastic bit about women's armor. It's almost too much that Adrienne's brother is weak and weepy, but since it's mentioned that this is a change that has come on in the last month, I'm sure there will be a story behind it in time.

When I remind myself both that this is a book intended for middle-grade readers and that this first volume has a lot of world building and character establishment to do, I'm pretty happy with it. I also find it interesting that while the ruling family is black, the only acknowledgement of racism in the book world is some anti-dwarf sentiment. I'm hoping he goes somewhere interesting with that.

Promising enough that I bought a copy for Jefferson's classroom for my We Need Diverse Books challenge. And bought volumes 2&3 for Jefferson. ( )
  greeniezona | Dec 1, 2017 |
Great read and reaffirming for girls by breaking out of that princess role. As the father of a young girl, I'm definitely going to be getting a copy of this to save for her to read in about 8-10 years; hope the series continues to be as strong and fun as this start. ( )
  SESchend | Sep 6, 2017 |
Cutely done version of fairly first-wave feminist tropes (see title), including the sensitive bad-fighter prince who’s the twin of the scrappy princess, locked up as a prize for the first prince who can defeat her dragon (spoiler: they can’t). The main humans are people of color, with a few weedy white princes and a half-dwarf girl and a greenish elf for contrast. It’s got a superficially strong message, but something [personal profile] astolat said to me once kept coming back to me, about how narratives that prioritize the single strange female rebel (or even the duo, once we get to the half-dwarf girl) reinforce the idea that female strength has to be fought for, instead of presumed to exist. Sometimes you want more from your fantasy. OTOH, as part of a broader diet, this is pretty cute. ( )
  rivkat | Jul 30, 2017 |
Cute series that upends the usual sexism of fairy-tale princesses, this is the story of a princess who sets out to save herself and her sib. The writing and art could be a bit tighter, but in general it's a great story and fun. ( )
  Gretchening | Jul 20, 2017 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Jeremy Whitleyprimary authorall editionscalculated
Goodwin, MiaIllustratormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Belton, D. E.Illustratorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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Princess Adrienne is tired of being locked in a tower, waiting around to be rescued by a prince. She escapes from the tower with the help of her guardian dragon, Sparky, and with her plucky sidekick Bedelia, Adrienne sets off on a quest to rescue her sisters who are suffering the same fate.… (more)

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