HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Renaissance: A Very Short Introduction…
Loading...

The Renaissance: A Very Short Introduction (edition 2009)

by Jerry Brotton (Author), Suzanne Toren (Narrator), Audible Studios (Publisher)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
173668,650 (3.66)3
Member:timspalding
Title:The Renaissance: A Very Short Introduction
Authors:Jerry Brotton (Author)
Other authors:Suzanne Toren (Narrator), Audible Studios (Publisher)
Info:Audible Studios (2009)
Collections:Your library
Rating:***
Tags:renaissance, early modern

Work details

The Renaissance: A Very Short Introduction by Jerry Brotton

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 3 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
I love the side-alleys of history—the relatively ignored, the peculiar, the losers, the things that could have been but didn't end up being, the stuff that's fascinating, but didn't move the world. My Classics/history grad school work was a parade of such topics. But there's a time and a place for such work, and a "Very Short Introduction" is not one of them. Rather, such books need to hit the dead center of the topic--the stuff that sets it apart, the stuff that matters. In another context, I'd love to hear Brotten talk about, say, Ottomans in the Renaissance. (I mean—I'm the guy who put Filelfo's poetic encomium to Mehmet the Conqueror on their Classics reading list!) But not in a Very Short History, where I expect to get a brilliant synthesis and theory. So… meh. ( )
  timspalding | Mar 14, 2017 |
The book is well written and examine importants aspects of Renaissance. An introduction that gives the reader (or the listener) a glimpse into the historical facts of the time and the literary and artistics works produced. Short book with valuable informations. ( )
  MarcusBastos | Feb 13, 2015 |
This is exactly what the title says it is - a very short introduction to the Renaissance. I love this series because it lets me quickly brush up on some areas of history. This one is a little more scattered than some others I've looked at, but that reflects the big subject that it entails. Brotton talks about humanism, exploration, art, science and printing. He tries to keep them tied together although the connections sometimes go by the wayside.

There were three key issues that I found most interesting. The first was humanism, which is very difficult to define. But it looks like it is the basis for modern liberal arts education, which values a well-rounded education as a way for self-cultiavation more than a vocational education to gain a livelihood. The author notes, however, that the ideals we sometimes attach to humanism (representative government, freedom, equality) are something we project back on the period. Humanists were as likely to work for tyrants as not. The paycheck was more important than the message.

Brotton also points out that the Renaissance was not a purely European phenomenon that shows its superiority. It was heavily influenced by earlier learning from the muslim world and India, but then built on that. He also shows that there was no clear idealogical divide between Christian and Muslim at this time, as Europeans routinely allied with Muslim powers if they had a common enemy.

Printing was also crucial to the Renaissance. Literacy was improving and many writers began writing in the vernacular rather than Latin or Greek. Science, poetry, novels and news were all distributed much more widely than was possible before the printing press. This meant that ideas could travel further and quicker than before, bringing more people into the creative process, which promoted more advances.

He then goes on to show the changes of the Renaissance helped promote the art we associate with it so stronger. And it promoted the oceanic exploration which would eventually lead to a much more integrated Euroasian-African economy. It also fostered religious change with the Protestant Reformation and the subsequent Catholic Reformation.

If this review seems disjointed, then it accurately reflects the book. Brotton has done an excellent job of explaining a huge phenomenon in a very short space. There was no way to avoid it seeming a little scattered. Yet it is still worth reading if you want a primer on the subject. ( )
  Scapegoats | Oct 27, 2014 |
A revisionist attempt to introduce the Renaissance, interpreting it in terms of Islam, absolutism, and greed. It is ambiguous about whether the Renaissance is an identifiable period or not. The author exhibits an attitude of contempt toward most of the leading figures of the period, its institutions, and its popular movements. There are frequent factual errors and contradictions.

What the author is good at is using detailed analysis of works of art to illustrate more general aspects of culture and society. This type of exegesis makes the opening chapter a much better read than the remainder of the book. I can't recommend this volume to anyone, but I especially discourage anyone who has little or no background in the period from relying on Botton for an introduction. ( )
  anthonywillard | Jan 15, 2013 |
Useful ( )
  Harrod | Dec 3, 2008 |
Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
National museums and art galleries are the most obvious places to go to understand what we mean when we talk about 'The Renaissance'.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (3)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0192801635, Paperback)

More than ever before, the Renaissance stands out as one of the defining moments in world history. Between 1400 and 1600, European perceptions of society, culture, politics and even humanity itself emerged in ways that continue to affect not only Europe but the entire world.
In this wide-ranging exploration of the Renaissance, Jerry Brotton shows the period as a time of unprecedented intellectual excitement, cultural experimentation, and interaction on a global scale, alongside a darker side of religion, intolerance, slavery, and massive inequality of wealth and status. Brotton skillfully guides us through the key issues that defined the Renaissance period, from its art, architecture, and literature, to advancements in the fields of science, trade, and travel. In its incisive account of the complexities of the political and religious upheavals of the period, the book argues that there are significant parallels between the Renaissance and our own era. This is the first clear and concise account of the Renaissance as a global phenomenon, an important new vision of the Renaissance for the 21st century written by a young Renaissance scholar of a new generation.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:24:10 -0400)

From the publisher. More than ever before, the Renaissance stands out as one of the defining moments in world history. Between 1400 and 1600, European perceptions of society, culture, politics and even humanity itself emerged in ways that continue to affect not only Europe but the entire world. Brotton shows the period as a time of unprecedented intellectual excitement, cultural experimentation, and interaction on a global scale, alongside a darker side of religion, intolerance, slavery, and massive inequality of wealth and status. Brotton skillfully guides us through the key issues that defined the Renaissance period, from its art, architecture, and literature, to advancements in the fields of science, trade, and travel. In its incisive account of the complexities of the political and religious upheavals of the period, the book argues that there are significant parallels between the Renaissance and our own era. This is the first clear and concise account of the Renaissance as a global phenomenon, an important new vision of the Renaissance for the 21st century written by a young Renaissance scholar of a new generation.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
16 wanted2 pay1 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.66)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 2
2.5
3 2
3.5 2
4 8
4.5 1
5 3

Audible.com

An edition of this book was published by Audible.com.

See editions

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

You are using the new servers! | About | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 113,237,549 books! | Top bar: Always visible