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Man-Eaters of Kumaon by Jim Corbett
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Man-Eaters of Kumaon (1944)

by Jim Corbett

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English (12)  Portuguese (1)  All languages (13)
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His team tracked them, he shot them, and then he wrote it up. Leopards are more dangerous than Tigers, who are meaner than Lions. This is a curious by-way of British Indian history. I first encountered this book as a Reader's Digest Condensed Book, and it wears well on the re-read. ( )
  DinadansFriend | Mar 14, 2015 |
better than i thought. ( )
  mahallett | Feb 1, 2014 |
A classic chest-thumping adventure story.
  AlCracka | Apr 2, 2013 |
We are so fortunate to live where we are the top of the food chain. When man is not at the top of the food chain it is harder to get their than you think even with our superior mind and weapons. ( )
  cwflatt | Mar 10, 2012 |
An intriguing account of the hunting of Man-eating Tigers in India. ( )
  T.Rex | Jan 12, 2012 |
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DEDICATED to the GALLANT SOLDIERS, SAILORS, AND AIRMEN of the United Nations, who during this war HAVE LOST THEIR SIGHT in the service of their country
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0195622553, Paperback)

Jim Corbett was every inch a hero, something like a "sahib" Davy Crockett: expert in the ways of the jungle, fearless in the pursuit of man-eating big cats, and above all a crack shot. Brought up on a hill-station in north-west India, he killed his first leopard before he was nine and went on to achieve a legendary reputation as a hunter.

Corbett was also an author of great renown. His books on the man-eating tigers he once tracked are not only established classics, but have by themselves created almost a separate literary genre. Man Eaters of Kumaon is the best known of Corbett's books, one which offers ten fascinating and spine-tingling tales of pursuing and shooting tigers in the Indian Himalayas during the early years of this century. The stories also offer first-hand information about the exotic flora, fauna, and village life in this obscure and treacherous region of India, making it as interesting a travelogue as it is a compelling look at a bygone era of big-game hunting.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 17:59:52 -0400)

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The author describes his experiences killing man-eating tigers of the Indian Himalayas in the 1920s and 1930s, explaining why some tigers become man-eaters and including details on the local flora, fauna, and village life.

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