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Pluto Visits Earth! by Steve Metzger
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Pluto Visits Earth!

by Steve Metzger

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This is an informative story about Pluto begin renamed a dwarf planet, but is disguised as a fun story about Pluto taking a trip across the galaxy to visit Earth scientists to get them to change their minds about their decision. Along the way, Pluto speaks to all three of his moons, most of the planets and even some comets. When he arrives at Earth, the scientists explain why he is no longer considered a planet and has been reclassified as a dwarf planet. Although Pluto doesn't like no longer being one of the nine planets, he discovers that children still learn about him.
Media: I thought pen and ink and watercolors, but the book says Rapidograph pen and Luma dyes
Genre: Informational ("Planets should be much larger than their moons, Astronomer B added. You're not."), Modern fantasy; science fiction fantasy as it plays with fact but the plot includes magical aspects ("I'll go visit Earth and demand to be a planet again. And with a mighty thrust, Pluto left his orbit and zoomed toward Earth. He asked other planets to help him out along the way.") ( )
  JessicaRojas | Apr 7, 2016 |
Pluto Visits Earth was a great way of integrating science into a book for young readers! It's main idea is to teach children about the planets, and it does this without turning it into a textbook. It is just a cute book that can fall into young readers hands, between the pictures, the plot, and more, I would recommend this whole heartedly.

It also clarifies any confusion people may have about Pluto in general, and it's removal from the planets. It takes the solar system from the point of view of an excluded planet, which was a great way to switch it up, in my opinion! Great read overall, and great for the classroom! ( )
  Skaide1 | Dec 8, 2014 |
Pluto Visits Earth is a cute story about the downgrading of Pluto from a planet to a dwarf planet. The vibrant colors are great for younger readers that enjoy friendly visuals, and the story is great for 3rd and 4th graders to learn about Pluto's designation. ( )
  jmitra1 | Dec 2, 2014 |
I thought this book did a wonderful job displaying informationand presenting it in a way kids can appreciate and understand. This book had fun illustrations that children can get intrigued with and they help the reader further understand the text. For example, when the author describes how saturn does not have time for pluto because he is to concerned with his own appearance, the way saturn is pictured is perfectly vain an disinterested. Plus, the text of this page is very informative, going into detail about what materials the rings around aturn is made of. The big picture of this book is to talk to kids about our solar system and help explain what it is made up of. Also, it is a tale about how Pluto used to be a planet and how it is not a planet anymore. ( )
  ajfurman | Oct 21, 2014 |
Pluto Visits Earth!
Bryan O'Keeffe

I really enjoyed reading this book. The idea of taking a controversial scientific issue and turning the issue into a book is amazing. Everything about this book is awesome. The thing that caught my attention the most were the illustration. The illustration are done really well and are kind of comical. They help enhance the story and bring the idea of coming to the different planets in the solar system to life. Pluto's character was really believable as well too. Pluto was given many human characteristics, for instance, Pluto went to visit each planet to know why it was no longer a planet. Each planet its self had their own personalities and made his journey that much believable. Saturn in particular was too busy being moody and wrapped up in its own rings to care about Pluto. The plot was very entertaining as well and was paced really well which helped the book flow really well too. The language was not difficult to read which makes this book easy for anyone to understand, especially a younger child. Every child will be able to learn from the message of this book; don't let others define you. ( )
  bokeef2 | Oct 17, 2014 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0545249341, Hardcover)

Pluto visits Earth in a truly out-of-this-world adventure!

Pluto is not pleased when he learns that astronomers have downgraded him from planet to dwarf planet. He embarks on a fun and out-of-this-world adventure across the solar system to visit Earth and reclaim his planetary status.

Along the way, Pluto bumps into his moons and other planets. But it's a boy on Earth who makes him realize that, big or small, planet or not, he's still special!

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:08:28 -0400)

Angry at being downgraded to a dwarf planet by Earth scientists, Pluto travels through the solar system, asking other planets along the way for support, in hopes of regaining his planetary status.

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