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Iron: Or, the War After

by Shane-Michael Vidaurri

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
777260,487 (3.93)5
It is the aftermath of a long war, in a world of constant winter. An intelligence spy from the Resistance -- the rabbit, Hardin -- steals secret information from a military base of the Regime. His actions set off a chain of events that reverberates through the ranks of both sides, touching everyone from Pavel the crow to Giles the goat, from the highest-ranking officials to the smallest orphaned child. When the snow finally settles, who will be the true patriot and who the true traitor?… (more)

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English (5)  French (1)  All languages (6)
Showing 5 of 5
Dark, murky, intriguing, and a little confusing.

( )
  DestDest | Jul 29, 2020 |
Can a graphic novel with very little text be lyrical? If so, this GN can be counted as an example of the translational ability of images. The story is somber and sad and not the least bit whimsical. An excellent read that will probably leave you a little heart-sore. ( )
  lesmel | Sep 5, 2014 |
“IN A WORLD OF CONSTANT WINTER… When an intelligence spy from the Resistance-the rabbit, Hardin-steals secret information from a military base of the Regime, his actions set off a chain of events that reverberates through the ranks of both sides, touching everyone from the highest-ranking official to the smallest orphaned child. When the snow finally settles, who will be the true patriot and who the true traitor?”

The heart wrenching blurb caught my eye while the cover of anthropomorphized rabbit running in a landscape does the rest for me. I have recently read about Alice in Wonderland, I did read about symbolism of animal in tales and this brought my interest for the “Iron or The War After”. It was until a few pages that I was immediately tuned to the work of SM Vidaurri.

The graphic novel started with gorgeous painting of a bird on a tree in shaded tones that was similar to eastern asian calligraphy painting. I am reading both in my B&W kindle and coloured in tablet and they were both definitely gorgeous in either medium. I noted the snowy landscapes that were beautifully captured by the artist and the relevance of anthropomorphized characters that were metaphorical crafted with each pages. By each pages, I found the soul within the novel that was painfully stroked into the paper and I was engrossed by the serious storyline.

Although the book is brief but the story is profound. Ink wash painting is a very highly skilled craft that I had tried once but never again. It is a hard work and require excessive patience and control to achieve a good stroke. Of course, it was very rare to find a western graphic novelist doing inkwash fully. However, I find the style is right for this novel. The overwhelming sadness and overtone of darkness that was carried by the characters in great depth was further emboldened by each contrasted frames . The artist effectively portrayed pretense confusions and self-contained destructiveness in great deal and he had given a sense of realism and identity to his work.

While I was not distracted by the artistry, I was utterly captivated by the characters in this book. Hardin’s desperation , his children’s sadness and anguish, Engel’s contempt and Pavel’s conflicts. Each chapters carried unpredictability, sense of morose and utter despair. It is truly an emotional work of art and I’m grateful to have experience it and enjoyed it thoroughly. ( )
  aoibhealfae | Sep 23, 2013 |
“IN A WORLD OF CONSTANT WINTER… When an intelligence spy from the Resistance-the rabbit, Hardin-steals secret information from a military base of the Regime, his actions set off a chain of events that reverberates through the ranks of both sides, touching everyone from the highest-ranking official to the smallest orphaned child. When the snow finally settles, who will be the true patriot and who the true traitor?”

The heart wrenching blurb caught my eye while the cover of anthropomorphized rabbit running in a landscape does the rest for me. I have recently read about Alice in Wonderland, I did read about symbolism of animal in tales and this brought my interest for the “Iron or The War After”. It was until a few pages that I was immediately tuned to the work of SM Vidaurri.

The graphic novel started with gorgeous painting of a bird on a tree in shaded tones that was similar to eastern asian calligraphy painting. I am reading both in my B&W kindle and coloured in tablet and they were both definitely gorgeous in either medium. I noted the snowy landscapes that were beautifully captured by the artist and the relevance of anthropomorphized characters that were metaphorical crafted with each pages. By each pages, I found the soul within the novel that was painfully stroked into the paper and I was engrossed by the serious storyline.

Although the book is brief but the story is profound. Ink wash painting is a very highly skilled craft that I had tried once but never again. It is a hard work and require excessive patience and control to achieve a good stroke. Of course, it was very rare to find a western graphic novelist doing inkwash fully. However, I find the style is right for this novel. The overwhelming sadness and overtone of darkness that was carried by the characters in great depth was further emboldened by each contrasted frames . The artist effectively portrayed pretense confusions and self-contained destructiveness in great deal and he had given a sense of realism and identity to his work.

While I was not distracted by the artistry, I was utterly captivated by the characters in this book. Hardin’s desperation , his children’s sadness and anguish, Engel’s contempt and Pavel’s conflicts. Each chapters carried unpredictability, sense of morose and utter despair. It is truly an emotional work of art and I’m grateful to have experience it and enjoyed it thoroughly. ( )
  aoibhealfae | Sep 23, 2013 |
At the beginning of this graphic novel, a letter is stolen which sets off a series of terrible events. The novel is both very political and anti-war. It is also, at times, very hard to follow. I'm not sure if this is due to the fact that there is little dialogue or the characters are animals, or perhaps it is the sheer number of characters. Having said this, despite having to go back several times to try to understand what was happening, I found the story intelligent and intriguing.

And much of my enjoyment was due to the stunning graphics - what a feast for the eyes!. They are done mainly in light washes of blue and gray which makes it even more eye-popping when the robin appears done in a beautiful scarlet.

As I said, this is not an easy story to follow. I suspect it would take two or three readings to start to get a real grasp on this complicated story. But, trust me, it would be worth it if only as an excuse to look at the graphics. ( )
  lostinalibrary | Jan 2, 2013 |
Showing 5 of 5
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It is the aftermath of a long war, in a world of constant winter. An intelligence spy from the Resistance -- the rabbit, Hardin -- steals secret information from a military base of the Regime. His actions set off a chain of events that reverberates through the ranks of both sides, touching everyone from Pavel the crow to Giles the goat, from the highest-ranking officials to the smallest orphaned child. When the snow finally settles, who will be the true patriot and who the true traitor?

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