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House Blood by Mike Lawson
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House Blood

by Mike Lawson

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I am part of a medical study through Harvard medical School intended to evaluate the efficacy of vitamin D in combination with Fish Oil. As a double blind study I might or might not be taking either of the drugs or a placebo. I have no way of knowing. That's as it should be. But I'm also at the mercy of those running the trial. I take on faith the purpose is what they say (and we know that in psychological studies they often prevaricate about the purpose of the study), and I assume those designing and running this incredibly expensive study are operating in an ethical and legal manner.

Now what if the backers of the study had something very different in mind and were using Harvard for their own purposes? What if they were acting perfectly within the law but were in blurry territory from an ethical standpoint? What if the result of this unethical behavior might result in a drug to cure a devastating illness? Does it matter if some people are sacrificed along the way?

That's the premise behind this excellent novel. I listened to this and don't know whether it's the book or the reader or a combination that totally captivated me. I have enjoyed other DeMarco stories, but this one blew away the others. It has humor, mystery, social commentary, very enjoyable.

DeMarco hates cutting the lawn, his idea of camping is a Hilton with slow room service, and the idea of wearing hiking books might give him hives. "What could be more perfect, New York v Boston –he hates those fucking Yankees– a steak, a baked potato slathered in butter and sour cream" -- yum. He's a kind-of Congressional fixer who has an office in the basement of Congress and he runs errands and investigations for Congressman Mahoney.

Mahoney asks him to look into the conviction of a friend of his wife's husband who had been convicted of killing his business party. We know right up front who the bag guys are, so the fun is in DeMarco's investigation. He can't seem to find any reason why the conviction shouldn't stand, but just a couple little things niggle the back of his mind. And the investigation, with the help of Emma, leads down a road he had no idea existed.

As far as I can tell the author hates lawyers, Congress, and big-Pharma.

12/28/2012 - And this just in: http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2012/12/28/pharma-firms-tested-drugs-on-east-germans-... ( )
  ecw0647 | Sep 30, 2013 |
Joe DeMarco, Washington D.C. problem solver is on the staff of the speaker of the house, John Mahoney.

Joe is told to look into the murder conviction of lobbyist Brian Kincaid.

At first it looks like a solid case but Joe begins to unravel the evidence and finds it was a clever set-up.

Orson Mulray is CEO of Mulray Pharma and wants to become one of the richest men in the world. He wants his company to develop a cure to a major disease but doesn't want to go through the red tape.

He hires scientists, develops a relationship with a woman who has a philanthropic organization helping people who have been in disasters. He makes an agreement with his corporate attorney, Fiona West, to help and finds remote places where he can conduct experiments. He also hires some ex-military to kill anyone getting in the way.

The suspense is skillfully delivered and DeMarco is a character who the reader will enjoy. The story also gives a good look at what might happen if a pharmaceutical company became greedy.

The novel is well crafted and deserves being on a list of the best thrillers of the year. ( )
  mikedraper | Apr 28, 2013 |
A pharmaceutical CEO hatches a plot to make himself the richest man in the world--even though it will mean cutting many corners and killing anyone who finds out what he's doing prematurely. Joe DeMarco is drawn in when Mahoney asks him to reinvestigate a murder to get Mahoney's wife off his back. Lots of running around and death ensues. ( )
  readinggeek451 | Jun 29, 2012 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0802119948, Hardcover)

DeMarco is asked to look into the murder conviction of a lobbyist. But he has other worries on his mind: his boss is no longer Speaker,his girlfriend has left him, andhis friend Emma may be dying. DeMarco doesn’t expect to free the lobbyist – much less to become the target of two of the most callous killers he and Emma have ever encountered.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:22:50 -0400)

DeMarco is asked to look into the murder conviction of a lobbyist. But he has other worries on his mind: his boss is no longer Speaker, his girlfriend has left him, and his friend Emma may be dying.

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