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Final Flight by Stephen Coonts
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Final Flight (original 1988; edition 1989)

by Stephen Coonts (Author)

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781520,366 (3.41)6
The crew of the supercarrier U.S.S. United States stands to lose their nuclear cargo and their lives to an international terrorist, and only commander Jake Grafton can save them.
Member:scallorn
Title:Final Flight
Authors:Stephen Coonts (Author)
Info:Dell (1989), 400 pages
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Final Flight by Stephen Coonts (1988)

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Showing 5 of 5
Genre: Techno-thriller novel. Grafton is now a CAG on a cruise in the Mediterranean. A group of terrorists kidnap some navy crew and learn how to penetrate the ship. Led by Qazy, they intend to steal nuclear bombs from the carrier. Meanwhile, Grafton deals with two accidents, leadership problems, and himself facing being grounded due to deteriored night sight. An anti terror-team led by Judith Farrel is after Qazy.
The later novel The Minatour describes the events after Grafton rammed the helicopter.
  MasseyLibrary | Mar 14, 2018 |
Spine tingling? Maybe? It was one hellova good Navy book. From the boring administrative details of Navy life, to the smashing conclusion; the book was a fun read. And, as always with a Coonts novel, our hero saves the world for democracy and the American way. ( )
  buffalogr | Jan 12, 2014 |
The novel, as with most, tarted out slow. I felt as if I were reading a Naval Air Primer for all the details lavished on process and activity. But as the story unfolded with multiple plot lines the depth of detail fell off and it became more the kind of novel I prefer.
The characters were well endowed with individual characteristics, mannerisms and foibles. There were a couple who seemed sterotypical characatures, which did little to hold my interest, but overall I think Stephen did an excellent job populating this novel.
I was a little disappointed how easily the terrorists commandeered a U.S. naval vessel, given the depth of procedural detail offered early on, but I understand that the story could not have unfolded otherwise.
The climax was well drawn, though a bit too TVish for me. And, like so many novels I've read of late, the protagonist dies and the aftermath of his demise is given short shrift. The last scene was unrealistic, but did provide some a modicum of closure. Because of the unique nature of creativity, I, as a writer, would have handled it quite differently and added more depth. Though she'd been a significant character in the story, Mrs. Grafton's loss was totally ignored.
There were places I felt needed more detail and other less, but overall, I think this was a good read. ( )
  DavidLErickson | Apr 30, 2011 |
Final Flight is an action yarn that is packed with detail. The basic premise centres around a terrorist's attempt to board a new American super-carrier to slip away with the nukes. It's Die Hard at sea. However, Coonts ensures this tale is as close to reality as possible, through good research and detailed characterisation. The build up, which is difficult at times due to the heady amount of acronyms the navy use, sets a solid background for the final two-thirds of the book, which is non-stop action and intrigue. It's gripping once you get past the initial scene-setting. There is however a lack of compassion for the lead roles. This is a result of their behaviours, which are realistic portrayals of those in armed forces management, but create a level of dislike for them at times. All in all, Final Flight is an enjoyable book, more factual that Cussler, less techno than Crichton, but worth a read. ( )
  SonicQuack | Apr 15, 2009 |
Sequel to Coonts' Flight of the Intruder and a decent book but a cut below the predecessor. ( )
  stpnwlf | Jul 17, 2007 |
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Confront the enemywith the tip of your sward against his face. ~Miyamoto Musashi A Book of the Five Rings
Dedication
FOR THEIR KINDNESS in offering technical advice to improve this novel, the author wishes to thank Lieutenant Commander James Boma; Commander R. E. "Smoke Davis Commander Al Die; Captain Stu Fitrell; Captain Steve Ganyard, USMC, Lieutenant Commander Robert S. Riche;
Robert L. Shaw; Barrett Tillman; and Commander Brucu Wood. For reasons that should be obvious, the ship described in this novel differs in several significant ways from Nimitz-class carrier.
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The crew of the supercarrier U.S.S. United States stands to lose their nuclear cargo and their lives to an international terrorist, and only commander Jake Grafton can save them.

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