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Annie and Helen by Deborah Hopkinson
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Annie and Helen

by Deborah Hopkinson

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This is a beautiful book about Helen Keller and her teacher, Annie Sullivan. Within this book, the author, Deborah Hopkinson, includes parts of multiple letters Annie wrote about her stay with Helen to a colleague at the Perkins Institution for the Blind. Annie is blunt and honest in her letters, she struggles at first with teaching Helen simple tasks, but once they form a bond, Annie is able to teach Helen sign language and reading and writing as well. Annie and Helen accomplish so much together, Helen is even able to go to college and she becomes the first deaf and blind person in the United States to earn a bachelor of arts.
This book was truly inspiring, both Helen and Annie stop at nothing to accomplish their dreams. ( )
  SMLawrence | Oct 18, 2014 |
This story follows the life of a young girl names Helen. Helen was born deaf and blind in a time where education for the deaf and blind was not very common. A young teacher named Annie comes to help the rebellious child learn how to communicate and express her feelings. The main idea of this text is to help the reader learn and understand the monumental story of educating the deaf-blind. It highlights the perseverance of both Helen and Annie. One of the strongest ways the author gets this message across if through real excerpts of Annie’s diaries. This not only helps the reader understand how Annie felt but it shows her determination to give a girl who seemed helpless an education. Reading Annie’s diary really pulled me into the story. Another way the author got their main point across was by being very descriptive in how Annie taught Helen. With every description the author gave I could picture Annie teaching Helen in my head. I really enjoyed this version of this well known story because it pulled me into the story. By reading Helen’s letter and Annie’s diary I could truly understand how they both felt at that exact moment in time. I also liked how the story made the readers think by asking them questions like “How could Annie teach her?” This made me think about what I would do in that situation and it gives me so much more respect for Annie’s perseverance. Finally, I thought that the pictures were very instrumental to this story. For a person who may not have heard this story or seen sign language this helps them visualize Helen’s learning process. ( )
  CarolinePfrang | Mar 24, 2014 |
Helen becomes deaf and blind. Annie has come to teach her how to communicate and function on her own. She teachers her words and there meanings through finger spelling.
  tina265 | Feb 26, 2014 |
This is a story of Helen Keller and her journey with her teacher Annie. You will see how Annie was able to open of helen's world with hands on teaching techniques
  bmmander | Nov 25, 2013 |
A wonderful children's version of the Helen Keller story. This book is nicely illustrated and features actual pictures of Helen as she grew up. ( )
  SJoachim | Sep 16, 2013 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0375857060, Hardcover)

"What is breathtakingly shown here, through accurate, cross-hatched watercolor paintings; excerpts from Sullivan’s correspondence to her former teacher; and concise and poetic language, is the woman’s patience and belief in the intelligence of her student to grasp the concepts of language," praised School Library Journal in a starred review.

Author Deborah Hopkinson and illustrator Raul Colón present the story of Helen Keller in a fresh and original way that is perfect for young children. Focusing on the relationship between Helen and her teacher, Annie Sullivan, the book is interspersed with excerpts of Annie's letters home, written as she struggled with her angry, wild pupil. But slowly, with devotion and determination, Annie teaches Helen finger spelling and braille, letters, and sentences. As Helen comes to understand language and starts to communicate, she connects for the first time with her family and the world around her. The lyrical text and exquisite art will make this fascinating story a favorite with young readers. Children will also enjoy learning the Braille alphabet, which is embossed on the back cover of the jacket.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:48:48 -0400)

Describes the relationship between Helen Keller and her teacher, Annie Sullivan, and includes excerpts from letters written by Annie about her work with Helen.

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