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Tales of the City by Philip Purser-Hallard

Tales of the City (edition 2012)

by Philip Purser-Hallard, Juliet Kemp (Author), Elizabeth Evershed (Author), Philip Purser-Hallard (Author), Cody Quijano-Schell (Illustrator)4 more, Blair Bidmead (Author), Helen Angrove (Author), Dale Smith (Author), Dave Hoskin (Author)

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102880,191 (3.75)None
Title:Tales of the City
Authors:Philip Purser-Hallard (Editor)
Other authors:Juliet Kemp (Author), Elizabeth Evershed (Author), Philip Purser-Hallard (Author), Cody Quijano-Schell (Illustrator), Blair Bidmead (Author)3 more, Helen Angrove (Author), Dale Smith (Author), Dave Hoskin (Author)
Info:Obverse Books (2012), Paperback
Collections:Your library
Tags:short stories, science fiction, spin-offery, anthology

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Tales of the City by Philip Purser-Hallard (Editor)



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The City of the Saved (the city after the end of the universe where everyone ever is alive again all at once) is a great idea, and I'm thankful that it's gotten its first full-length feature here. Highlights include Elizabeth Evershed's "The Socratic Problem," where Socrates is brought on a guest lecturer at a City university; "Highbury" by Helen Angove, set in a district of the City inhabited by people from Regency England and people who wish they were from Regency England; and the magnificently creepy "Bruises" by Dave Hoskin.
  Stevil2001 | Mar 3, 2014 |
The City of the Saved is one of my favourite science-fiction concepts: a secular afterlife at the end of time, in which every human being is resurrected in an immortal body. Previous entries in the series have tended to focus on the meta-scale of the City: the stories of this collection instead those of the City's ordinary residents. The strongest entries – such as Blair Bidmead's standout "Happily Ever After is a High-Risk Strategy" – are those that utilise the series' unique concept most effectively; examining the effect eternity has on life's assumptions and narratives. The weakest (though there are no truly weak stories in Tales of the City) stray furthest from the central conceit, drifting instead into the sort of genre pastiche that could be equally at home in a number of other series. And some will leave you feeling pretty uncomfortable (I dread my next bruise). ( )
1 vote m_k_m | Mar 19, 2013 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Purser-Hallard, PhilipEditorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Angrove, HelenContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bidmead, BlairContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Evershed, ElizabethContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Hoskin. DaveContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Kemp, JulietContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Purser-Hallard, PhilipContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Quijano-Schell, CodyCover artistsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Smith, DaleContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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