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Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder…
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Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder

by Nassim Nicholas Taleb

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I heard an interview with the author and it was very interesting. So far the prologue is interesting as well, I will see if the rest of the book lives up to the hype.
  ChrisBriden | Jan 26, 2014 |
Excellent book. Requires hard thinking and facing up to the truth.
  fconte | Jul 1, 2013 |
'Anti-fragility tells us how to take advantage of catastrophic events, it is very much a sequel to The Black Swan it builds on many of the Black Swan's themes.'

In The Black Swan, Taleb explained the existence of high impact rare events beyond the realms of normal expectations. In his new book, Taleb goes much further. He tells us how to live in a world that is unpredictable and chaotic, and how to thrive during moments of disaster. Antifragility is about loving randomness, uncertainty, opacity, adventure and disorder, and benefitting from a variety of shocks. It is a new word because it is a new concept. Many of the greatest breakthroughs in human endeavour come from the trial and error that is part of antifragility. And some of the best systems we know of, including evolution, have antifragility at their heart. Medicine, economics, even politics, could all be improved by embracing it. It is often what really drives innovation and invention. Our failure to realize this has even led to many huge historical misunderstandings about religion and belief. So, how can we take advantage of antifragility? Taleb ranges over ideas and real-life situations, from why debt brings fragility, why if we lose nothing we will gain nothing, and why we should detest the lack of accountability at the heart of capitalism. He shows us that chaos is what makes us human. (source: Bol.com)
1 vote jbuskermolen | Jun 15, 2013 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
Taleb is a tail event of his own, a challenge to the accepted methodologies using prediction through point estimates and reliance on squares-based statistics as input to linear models. The right way to avoid bigger crises - financial and otherwise - is to encourage systems that benefit from volatility and feedback mechanisms. For example, "Depriving political (and other) systems of volatility harms them, causing eventually greater volatility of the cascading type" (p. 81). Along the way, he tears apart major theories in economics and finance, introduces some street-smart characters who really run the world, and sketches out an aura around himself that the reader might like and might not. In either case, Taleb won't care; he would much rather the reader accept his ideas for the sake of us all. ( )
  jpsnow | Jun 2, 2013 |
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Sometimes he [author Nassim Nicholas Taleb] is led astray by his contrarianism, but then that is his point: If you don't take risks, you don't get results. This is a bold, entertaining, clever book, richly crammed with insights, stories, fine phrases and intriguing asides. Does it achieve its goal, or does it cram and twist the world on to a Procrustean bed of one theory, thereby somewhat contradicting its own empirical and pragmatic outlook? I am not sure. I will have to read it again. And again.
added by sgump | editWall Street Journal, Matt Ridley (Nov 27, 2012)
 
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"The acclaimed author of the influential bestseller The Black Swan, Nicholas Nassim Taleb takes a next big step with a deceptively simple concept: the "antifragile." Like the Greek hydra that grows two heads for each one it loses, people, systems, and institutions that are antifragile not only withstand shocks, they benefit from them. In a modern world dominated by chaos and uncertainty, Antifragile is a revolutionary vision from one of the most subversive and important thinkers of our time"--… (more)

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Penguin Australia

Two editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 1846141567, 1846141575

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