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Judging a Book by Its Lover: A Field Guide…
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Judging a Book by Its Lover: A Field Guide to the Hearts and Minds of… (original 2012; edition 2012)

by Lauren Leto

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1531278,096 (3.54)12
Member:Bodagirl
Title:Judging a Book by Its Lover: A Field Guide to the Hearts and Minds of Readers Everywhere
Authors:Lauren Leto
Info:Harper Perennial (2012), Edition: Original, Paperback, 288 pages
Collections:Read, Read but unowned
Rating:***
Tags:books about books, reading, contemporary fiction, criticism, contemporary literature

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Judging a Book by Its Lover: A Field Guide to the Hearts and Minds of Readers Everywhere by Lauren Leto (2012)

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Showing 1-5 of 12 (next | show all)
This is a must have for serious readers. It's incredibly funny and will fill in a lot of your literary knowledge "gaps." ( )
  dulcinea14 | Sep 18, 2014 |
Part memoir, part field guide, this is a fun book for anyone who loves books. While the anecdotes about Leto's life are fun, the best part is when she talks about the books and the people who love them, stereotyping all the way. ( )
  bookwyrmm | Aug 26, 2014 |
Shelf Notes Review

Dear Reader,

This book was included in the BookRiot Quarterly box, check it out. Anyone who loves getting surprise mail, especially book related, should check out this subscription. Judging a Book by Its Lover isn't a book I would have picked up on my own, the Author is the co-creator of the popular site Texts From Last Night. I wouldn't have thought her to be someone who has a lot to say about books and literature but how wrong that is! After enjoying every little chapter, I can now say that I will be following her on twitter and other social media sites to devour more of her bookish knowledge. She is extremely well read but not elitist about it, she isn't afraid to put down her own tastes and make fun of anyone and everyone. I find it very compelling that she has the balls to do this and this book shines because of it.

Every chapter has something to enjoy, whether it be a comical review or advice on how to impress someone with your book reading prowess (even if you haven't read the book). I came away from this book adding quite a few "to-reads" and discovering things I didn't even know about myself. One of my favorite chapters was called, Petition to Change the Term from "Bookworm" to "Bookcat". The title says it all, and I stand behind her on this 100%. I will admit, there were times in this book that I felt a pang of anger when she jabbed at a favorite Author of mine, but I had to remind myself this was all in jest and she does it to everyone, even the most acclaimed.

Another section of the book that had me on the floor laughing was the part that stereotyped the reader by their favorite Author. I found myself ashamed to admit that a few of these nailed it straight to my heart, and a few others I giggled about knowing it described perfectly other people in my life. I think the best part of this book is the connection you get with Lauren Leto, knowing she is just another reader like you... but how she is sharing these funny tidbits to connect you to the world of other readers. She tells you a little about herself, growing up without many friends, bumping into walls because she can't put a book down long enough to look where shes going. All those little quirks about her, those are the things that I related to most and she pulls you into her world before she bashes her hammer down on your favorites, bringing a little reality to the world of literary snobs. I loved everything about it.

I can't help but want to shove this book into every hand I know who loves to read. It's quick, witty and makes your stomach hurt from all the laughter. Bravo to BookRiot and Lauren Leto for this wonderful reading escapade, I will be picking this book and referencing it for years to come.

Happy Reading,
AmberBug

P.S. - I feel lucky to have read two favorites within the past month, but it always leaves me worried that my next read will be criticized all the more because of that. Keep that in mind when you read the next few reviews, I might be a little less gracious with me ratings. ( )
  yougotamber | Aug 22, 2014 |
A collection of essays, mostly humorous, about books, readers, and literature, including rules for "bookstore hookups," speculation about what it would be like to invite various famous literary couples to dinner, and a guide to "how to write like any author," among other things.

Being a book person myself -- of course! -- I was hoping this was a book I would really click with, but... Yeah, not so much. Some of it is amusing, and there are a couple of more serious pieces at the end that are rather nice. And the section about how to fake it when talking about books you haven't read is full of a lot of interesting trivia about various authors. But that "faking it" conceit just bugs me, even if it is tongue-in-cheek. (And given the anecdote she relates elsewhere involving lying about having read Infinite Jest, it may not be entirely tongue-in-cheek.) This, I'm afraid, is where the failure to click comes in. Because while Leto clearly does genuinely love books, she's way too preoccupied with the idea of looking cool and hip and impressing people with your ability to talk about books at cocktail parties, or wherever it is cool, hip people get together to talk about books. I don't know, because that is really, really not what being a reader is about for me, and it annoys me that Leto keeps talking to me as if she's assuming it is.

She's also.. Well, I was going to say "a little too snarky," but that's not really it; I like me some good snark. It's more that she's often just not quite witty enough to make the leap from "uncomfortably judgmental" into "acerbically funny" when she's slinging the snark.

I feel like I'm probably being way too hard on what is really a fairly fluffy and mostly perfectly readable little book. I think I'm just allergic to a certain kind of pretentiousness, and I can't help but detect more than a whiff of it here. ( )
6 vote bragan | May 8, 2014 |
I wasn't so impressed with the 'How To Fake It' section, particularly since I don't believe in lying about what you have or have not read, but I enjoyed most of it. 'Survival of the Nerdiest' was my favourite and I have it tagged for rereading. ( )
  pjhugs | Nov 24, 2013 |
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The first book I ever loved was a book about a monster in a child's closet.
Quotations
Author's Note: Let me be plain when I state that my judgments, wisecracks, and sarcastic comments come from a place of deap admiration for every one of the authors whose work I discuss in these pages. There is nothing more beautiful than a well-written book, and there is nothing more admirable than the attempt to create something beautiful.
Life happens alongside the act of reading - a story is forever lixed with where we were and what we were doing while we were reading that book
The day I change my reading habits to preserve the appearance of my books is the day I start to die inside, for surely I'll have stopped loving to read.
Literature connects by transporting people to the same consciousness; a stranger the same book you've read, whose eyes passed over the same words, may be part of a completely different environment, and even time, but for a while, at least, they shared a world with you.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0062070142, Paperback)

Want to impress the hot stranger at the bar who asks for your take on Infinite Jest? Dying to shut up the blowhard in front of you who’s pontificating on Cormac McCarthy’s “recurring road narratives”? Having difficulty keeping Francine Prose and Annie Proulx straight?

For all those overwhelmed readers who need to get a firm grip on the relentless onslaught of must-read books to stay on top of the inevitable conversations that swirl around them, Lauren Leto’s Judging a Book by Its Lover is manna from literary heaven! A hilarious send-up of—and inspired homage to—the passionate and peculiar world of book culture, this guide to literary debate leaves no reader or author unscathed, at once adoring and skewering everyone from Jonathan Franzen to Ayn Rand to Dostoyevsky and the people who read them.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:46:45 -0400)

"Want to impress the hot stranger at the bar who asks for your take on Infinite Jest? Dying to shut up the blowhard in front of you who's pontificating on Cormac McCarthy's "recurring road narratives"? Having difficulty keeping Francine Prose and Annie Proulx straight? For all those overwhelmed readers who need to get a firm grip on the relentless onslaught of must-read books to stay on top of the inevitable conversations that swirl around them, Lauren Leto's Judging a Book by Its Lover is manna from literary heaven! A hilarious send-up of--and inspired homage to--the passionate and peculiar world of book culture, this guide to literary debate leaves no reader or author unscathed, at once adoring and skewering everyone from Jonathan Franzen to Ayn Rand to Dostoyevsky and the people who read them"--P. [4] of cover.… (more)

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