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The Madman's Daughter (Madman's…

The Madman's Daughter (Madman's Daughter - Trilogy) (edition 2013)

by Megan Shepherd

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7057113,430 (3.73)7
Title:The Madman's Daughter (Madman's Daughter - Trilogy)
Authors:Megan Shepherd
Info:Balzer Bray (2013), Hardcover, 432 pages
Collections:Already Read, Your library, eBook
Tags:young adult, science fiction, historical fiction, horror, thriller

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The Madman's Daughter by Megan Shepherd


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3.5 stars ( )
  ACascadeofBooks | Oct 5, 2016 |
Brilliant Doctor or Mad Scientist?? If you've ever read H.G. Wells, The Island of Dr. Moreau, then you'll recognize this book as a spin-off from it. The Madman's Daughter is told from the point of view of Dr. Moreau's daughter, Juliet. The story focuses on how Juliet deals with her fall from high society after her father's scandal and subsequent disappearance. Juliet was very young when the scandal happen so she doesn't really know what to believe and isn't sure exactly what happened to him so she sets out to find out for herself....
I thought it was a pretty good alternative to the original story. It has a dark, gothic feel to it with a little romance and a little gore. What really got me though was the ending. It was one of the biggest twists I've read recently and it hit me like a ton of bricks because I did not see it coming at all. I also didn't realize this was a trilogy when I started reading it but I'm glad it is, after that gut wrenching ending. Thankfully, my hold on the second book, Her Dark Curiosity, is ready for pick up tomorrow. My stack just keeps getting bigger and bigger instead of smaller.  ( )
  EmpressReece | Aug 22, 2016 |
Overall I just found this book to be okay. I thought I would like it a heck of a lot more than I did. Was it creepy? Oh yes. This book is pretty messed up at parts, but with it's inspiration, I don't know how one could assume otherwise. I did like Juliet and the characters, but there was just something about the book that did not draw me in. It's a bit of a bummer for me, but I don't think I'll be continuing this story. If you like a good, creepy, gothic-type story I would recommend this one though. 3.5 out of 5 stars. ( )
  Beammey | Jul 23, 2016 |
A story set in 1890s (?) London, it's told from the point of view of Juliet, a young empoverished teen girl. She survives without her genteel mother (died) & her "banished" famous father scientist, Henri Moreau, by cleaning at the medical hospital where her father once was an esteemed teacher and surgeon. From page one, Juliet is threatened by a creepy doctor who pretends to look out for her, but has more carnal designs. Then her well off friend Lucy takes her to a "forbidden" party, both of them unescorted amid a group of Lucy's cousin Adam & friends, all medical students. Lucy dazzles them with her knowledge of the human skeleton and accepts a wager to sneak back into the medical building, & find a skeleton. However, they actually stumble on a group of students performing an vivasection experiment on a rabbit, in spite of the university's prohibition against it- to Juliet's horror she recognizes the notes they're consulting are her father's. The lurid details are provided, I assume, for drama's sake, but this author's constant references to Juliet's thoughts, past, etc makes it clumsy at best. Juliet chops off the rabbit's head to end its agony and shocked, Lucy drags her out. And all in two short chapters- in between these plot details we learn Juliet's fears about being more like her father- a cruel, logical scientist, and not heeding her mother's voice, a gentle, well reared upper class woman forced to take on a "male caller" after her father left them behind (having fled the country because of his illegal medical activities). And this is only the start - Juliet tries to seek out the "doctor" the medical students had admitted had given them the diagrams, thinking her father might be back in the city. She gets "abducted" by a heavily bearded strange man, & in this process, re-discovers Dr. Moreau's longtime servant and lab assistant, Montgomery. Montogmery fills in some details about what's become of her father; needing to leave London, she insists on sailing w/Montogmery on a ship to the remote island where her father has relocated, hoping to reunite with him. During the journey, a boat with a shipwrecked, almost dead young man is taken aboard, and with Juliet's medical assistance, nursed back to health. Edward has a mysterious past, only admitting that he's fleeing a domineering father, a general on a tour of duty, and not eager to reunite with an aristocratic family back home. This is chapter ten.... Needless to say, the plot twists and turns continue, including meeting her father again on his jungle island, experiencing the strange, somewhat deformed staff who serve her father in his compound, and trying to decide if she could actually help him. Very quickly, via a dark, foreboding lab building, she discovers to her horror(but all the hints/details about Dr. Moreau provided throughout the book doesn't surprise us, so why her?) that he has continued to pursue strange, unholy experiments on animals to make them human-like. Edward and Montgomery circle her -as expected- while Juliet expresses in breathless prose how she is attracted to both and can't decide if and who she loves. Juliet's constant mental handwringing and angst over every emotion she feels, told in overblown descriptions and distracting metaphors became tedious. There's some real tension about how and when the three main characters will escape off the island, but with 45 chapters total (a bit much for my patience level) and at 360 pages it probably would be a challenge to all but the most devoted of teen (girl) readers. And yes it ends with a surprising (albeit unrealistic) twist, a cliffhanger that will be continued with her subsequent books in this series. ( )
  BDartnall | Jul 5, 2016 |
The idea of this story both fascinated and horrified me, but I did not like Juliet. She was so irritating, saying the same things about herself over and over; I pretty much understood her after the rabbit incident. The love triangle was weak and distracting, but Montgomery was dreamy in a sick sort of way. I heard it's going to be a movie; if that's true, I think it will be much better than the book. Seriously doubt I'll read the rest of the series. ( )
  mtlkch | Jun 21, 2016 |
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To Jesse -
I love you madly.
First words
The basement hallways in King's College of Medical Research were dark, even in the daytime.
At night they were like a grave.
Why did I have to learn he was alive from a bloodstained diagram at a late-night vivisection?
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Dr. Moreau's daughter, Juliet, travels to her estranged father's island, only to encounter murder, medical horrors, and a love triangle.

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