HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Law Man: My Story of Robbing Banks, Winning…
Loading...

Law Man: My Story of Robbing Banks, Winning Supreme Court Cases, and…

by Shon Hopwood

Other authors: Dennis Burke

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
283389,858 (3.8)None
Recently added byrexparte, Burch, 1Randal, jenniebooks
None

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Showing 3 of 3
This book is a memoir of Shon Hopwood who robbed five banks and while in federal prison ends up drafting legal briefs for fellow inmates. Hopwood writes two petitions for writ of certiorari to the Supreme Court of which get granted. It is a very rare occurrence that a petition for writ of certiorari written by an inmate gets granted but for Hopwood it happened. I found this to be a very interesting memoir and as a student studying to become a paralegal it was very inspiring. I could have done without the 'come to Jesus' part towards the end, but it did feel genuine to me. I would recommend this to law students. ( )
  dpappas | Mar 4, 2013 |
Don’t let this three buzz rating stop you from reading this book. True, it’s not well written, as often happens when one tells one’s own story (even with the help of a ghost writer). Nevertheless it’s a fabulous tale. If you are a person who has veered off onto a dark path or if you’re the parent or spouse or grandparent or friend of one who has done so, this story will inspire you.

Shon Hopwood held up five banks and was sent to prison. Had he been a typical American prisoner, that would have been the end of his story.

It’s not the end of Shon Hopwood’s story. He is now happily married, with two kids, and is attending law school.

I’ll say it again: An inspiring story. ( )
  debnance | Aug 12, 2012 |
Showing 3 of 3
The prose is clear and thoughtful, vividly illustrating the grim absurdity of life in prison, and most readers will root for Hopwood’s attempts to follow a different path. However, some readers will tire of the author’s proselytizing tone with respect to his rediscovered Christian faith.

 

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Shon Hopwoodprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Burke, Dennissecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0307887839, Hardcover)

Law Man is an improbable-but-true memoir of redemption -- the story of a young bank robber who became the greatest jailhouse lawyer in American history, and who changed not just his own life, but the lives of everyone around him.
 
Shon Hopwood was a good kid from a good Nebraskan family, a small-town basketball star whose parents had started a local church. Few who knew him as a friendly teen would have imagined that, shortly after returning home from the Navy, he’d be adrift with few prospects and plotting to rob a bank.  But rob he did, committing five heists before being apprehended.
 
Only twenty three and potentially facing twelve years in Illinois’ Pekin Federal Prison, Shon feared his life was already over. He’d shamed himself and his loving family and friends, and a part of him wanted to die.  He wasn’t sure at first if he’d survive the prison gangs, but slowly glimmers of hope appeared.  He earned some respect on the prison basketball court, received a steady flow of letters from hometown well wishers, including a note from a special girl whom he’d thought too beautiful to ever pay him notice – and, most crucially, he secured a job in the prison law library.
 
It was an assignment that would prove his salvation.
 
Poring over the library’s thick legal volumes, Shon discovered that he had a knack for the law, and he soon became the go-to guy for inmates seeking help. Then came a request to write a complex petition to the Supreme Court – a high-wire act of jailhouse lawyering that had never before met with success. 
 
By the time Shon walked out of Pekin Prison he’d pulled off a series of legal miracles, earned the undying gratitude of numerous inmates, won the woman of his dreams, and built a new life for himself far greater than anything he could have imagined.
 
A story that mixes moments of high-adrenaline with others of deep poignancy, Law Man is a powerful reminder that even the worst mistakes can be redeemed through faith, hard work and the love and support of others.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:42:09 -0400)

Traces how the author, a Navy veteran, committed five bank robberies and spent years in prison before he rallied with the support of family and friends and learned savvy legal skills, allowing him to build a promising life as a free man.

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
14 wanted1 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.8)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 1
3.5
4 4
4.5
5

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 93,360,252 books! | Top bar: Always visible