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Reminiscences chiefly of Oriel College and…
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Reminiscences chiefly of Oriel College and the Oxford Movement Vol.I (edition 1882)

by T. Mozley

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Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: ' their lives; but who to me were nothing and are nothing, for they were concerned only for themselves, and perhaps for some other people in some subordi- I nate degree. CHAPTER IV. NEWMAN, FELLOW OF ORIEL. It was in 1823 that Newman was elected to a fellowship at Oriel; and it was always a comfort to him that he had been able to give his father this good news at a time of great sorrow and embarrassment. The father died not long after, and the family may be said then to have had no home. They resided for short periods at Brighton, at Strand-on-the-Green, and other places; and some members of the family paid long and frequent visits to Samuel Rickards, a quaint, patriarchal, and truly saintly man, at Ulcombe, near the Earl of Winchelsea's place. Lord Maid- stone?rather eccentric then, in due time the very eccentric earl?was Rickards' pupil. He had considerable powers of caricature, as Etonians all remember, and he was glad to contribute to any lady's album. Though Rickards lived to be left far behind in the race of development, he and his surroundings, whether at Ulcombe, or at Stowlangloft, near Bury St. Edmund's, were always very dear to the Newman family. In October 1827 Newman and his sistersNUN EH AM COURTNEY. 27 paid a most interesting visit to Highwood, where Mr. Wilberforce then resided, and where the three younger sons were then assembled. In the summer of 1829 the family took a furnished cottage in a very out-of-the-way spot at Horspath, of which Dr. Ellerton, a well-known Fellow and tutor of Magdalene College, had charge. This was pleasant enough in the summer, but when Dornford, a Fellow of Oriel, who was serving Nuneham Courtney, and had the use of a cottage there, offered it to the Newmans, they were glad to avail themselves of the opportunity, thou...… (more)
Member:pghnclibrary
Title:Reminiscences chiefly of Oriel College and the Oxford Movement Vol.I
Authors:T. Mozley
Info:London, Longmans, Green, and Co., 1882
Collections:Oratorian Library, Your library
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Reminiscences chiefly of Oriel College and the Oxford Movement by Thomas Mozley

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Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: ' their lives; but who to me were nothing and are nothing, for they were concerned only for themselves, and perhaps for some other people in some subordi- I nate degree. CHAPTER IV. NEWMAN, FELLOW OF ORIEL. It was in 1823 that Newman was elected to a fellowship at Oriel; and it was always a comfort to him that he had been able to give his father this good news at a time of great sorrow and embarrassment. The father died not long after, and the family may be said then to have had no home. They resided for short periods at Brighton, at Strand-on-the-Green, and other places; and some members of the family paid long and frequent visits to Samuel Rickards, a quaint, patriarchal, and truly saintly man, at Ulcombe, near the Earl of Winchelsea's place. Lord Maid- stone?rather eccentric then, in due time the very eccentric earl?was Rickards' pupil. He had considerable powers of caricature, as Etonians all remember, and he was glad to contribute to any lady's album. Though Rickards lived to be left far behind in the race of development, he and his surroundings, whether at Ulcombe, or at Stowlangloft, near Bury St. Edmund's, were always very dear to the Newman family. In October 1827 Newman and his sistersNUN EH AM COURTNEY. 27 paid a most interesting visit to Highwood, where Mr. Wilberforce then resided, and where the three younger sons were then assembled. In the summer of 1829 the family took a furnished cottage in a very out-of-the-way spot at Horspath, of which Dr. Ellerton, a well-known Fellow and tutor of Magdalene College, had charge. This was pleasant enough in the summer, but when Dornford, a Fellow of Oriel, who was serving Nuneham Courtney, and had the use of a cottage there, offered it to the Newmans, they were glad to avail themselves of the opportunity, thou...

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