HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Who Moved My Cheese? by Spencer Johnson
Loading...

Who Moved My Cheese? (1998)

by Spencer Johnson

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
6,133118668 (3.25)77

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 77 mentions

English (113)  Spanish (3)  Dutch (1)  Hebrew (1)  All (118)
Showing 1-5 of 113 (next | show all)
Simple story. Big impact.

I'm a bit of Scurry and Haw.

Fun read to apply to my professional and personal life. ( )
  BefuddledPanda | Dec 4, 2017 |
I so needed the lessons in this book. Everyone could benefit from reading this. A quick, eye-opening read. ( )
  CherieKephart | Aug 3, 2017 |
This is a brief tale of two mice and two humans who live in a maze and one day are faced with change: someone moves their cheese. Reactions vary from quick adjustment to waiting for the situation to change by itself to suit their needs. This story is about adjusting attitudes toward change in life, especially at work. Change occurs whether a person is ready or not, but the author affirms that it can be positive. His principles are to anticipate change, let go of the old, and do what you would do if you were not afraid. Listeners are still left with questions about making his or her own specific personal changes.
  CarthexisConsInc. | Jul 9, 2017 |
good, short book. apparently intended to teach people how to move out of their comfort zone. ( )
  GSSC | Jun 6, 2017 |
I would classify this as business fiction. The core of the book is a parable about dealing with change, set within the context of a conversation between thin, contrived characters talking at a 'school reunion.' The greatest part of this book is that you can probably read it in less than an hour. Its central message is simple to grasp and can be fruitfully used in discussion, but I do wish that the story itself didn't keep reminding me of that. ( )
  Jamichuk | May 22, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 113 (next | show all)
There are many popular books that talk about change – how it is inevitable and how to accept it. Perhaps none explain it in a format you will always remember.
 

» Add other authors (26 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Spencer Johnsonprimary authorall editionscalculated
Blanchard, KennethForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Tol, Pim vanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Torné, MontserratTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Information from the Spanish Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Once, long ago in a land far away, there lived four little creatures who ran through a maze looking for cheese to nourish them and make them happy.
Quotations
'Cheese' is metaphor for what you want to have in life—whether it is a good job, a loving relationship, money, a possession, health, or spiritual peace of mind.
Last words
Disambiguation notice
ISBN 1101496991 is for Prime Crime Holiday Bundle by Emily Brightwell
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0399144463, Hardcover)

Change can be a blessing or a curse, depending on your perspective. The message of Who Moved My Cheese? is that all can come to see it as a blessing, if they understand the nature of cheese and the role it plays in their lives. Who Moved My Cheese? is a parable that takes place in a maze. Four beings live in that maze: Sniff and Scurry are mice--nonanalytical and nonjudgmental, they just want cheese and are willing to do whatever it takes to get it. Hem and Haw are "littlepeople," mouse-size humans who have an entirely different relationship with cheese. It's not just sustenance to them; it's their self-image. Their lives and belief systems are built around the cheese they've found. Most of us reading the story will see the cheese as something related to our livelihoods--our jobs, our career paths, the industries we work in--although it can stand for anything, from health to relationships. The point of the story is that we have to be alert to changes in the cheese, and be prepared to go running off in search of new sources of cheese when the cheese we have runs out.

Dr. Johnson, coauthor of The One Minute Manager and many other books, presents this parable to business, church groups, schools, military organizations--anyplace where you find people who may fear or resist change. And although more analytical and skeptical readers may find the tale a little too simplistic, its beauty is that it sums up all natural history in just 94 pages: Things change. They always have changed and always will change. And while there's no single way to deal with change, the consequence of pretending change won't happen is always the same: The cheese runs out. --Lou Schuler

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:03:43 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

A parable that teaches lessons about change and how to deal with it.

» see all 5 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
316 avail.
43 wanted
1 pay4 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.25)
0.5 15
1 101
1.5 20
2 159
2.5 25
3 296
3.5 41
4 284
4.5 20
5 197

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 119,731,095 books! | Top bar: Always visible