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Cover of Snow: A Novel by Jenny Milchman
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Cover of Snow: A Novel (original 2013; edition 2013)

by Jenny Milchman

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3477231,518 (3.31)29
Member:ThoughtsofJoyLibrary
Title:Cover of Snow: A Novel
Authors:Jenny Milchman
Info:Ballantine Books (2013), Hardcover, 336 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:LTER Win, Nov 12

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Cover of Snow by Jenny Milchman (Author) (2013)

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» See also 29 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 74 (next | show all)
Confronted within minutes with characters named Teggie and Club, and dog named Weekend, I anticipated little joy from Jenny Milchman's first efforts as a mystery novelist. The good news is that it wasn't as bad as I expected, but since I expected it to be abysmal, that isn't saying much. (There are spoilers after this point)

One snowy, bitter cold morning, one were there is a cover of snow and the air is quite frigid, our heroine Nora awakes late to find her husband has committed suicide in the dank, chilly attic she has been remodeling. As she pursues the reason behind his out of character choice, she meets resistance where ordinarily she would expect help while finding help in unlikely places.

The biggest problem with the book is that it is bloated. The main reason that it is bloated is the protagonist's ineptitude. And too much snow. How many times do you open a box that has a lid that catches before you decide to figure out why? Me? One! Then the bad guys who the readers are to believe have held sway over the the town are equally inept. If you are searching a car for a fairly thin item, would you go through a box, dump it's contents ignoring the fact that for some reason the lid catches? Not me! I would have torn the thing to pieces. Poor Nora rarely finds a clue on her own. She has nearly every one of them presented with a bow on top, then promptly fails to follow through in any effectual way.

At the beginning the hints and pacing are well handled to create plenty of suspense. However, as the story progresses there are just too many odd angles that never are fully resolved. Red herrings are part of the trade, but eventually their context needs explaining.

The next complaint must be filed under frivolous. This book has too much snow. Long ago I despised reading books set on boats. They made me claustrophobic. I got over it. Then, books set I deserts proved problematic. Mostly over that. Books with insistence on the snow and cold I just do not adore. I suppose we all have our peculiar book turn offs. No doubt you can guess my least favorite of Laura Ingalls Wilder's output. If Milchman could go more than a page without mentioning the temperature or snow it would have helped. The book club discussion on this one will go thusly, "Why didn't you like the book, Lisa?" There is too much snow." Promises to be a brilliant discussion. ( )
  lucybrown | Sep 27, 2015 |
Confronted within minutes with characters named Teggie and Club, and dog named Weekend, I anticipated little joy from Jenny Milchman's first efforts as a mystery novelist. The good news is that it wasn't as bad as I expected, but since I expected it to be abysmal, that isn't saying much. (There are spoilers after this point)

One snowy, bitter cold morning, one were there is a cover of snow and the air is quite frigid, our heroine Nora awakes late to find her husband has committed suicide in the dank, chilly attic she has been remodeling. As she pursues the reason behind his out of character choice, she meets resistance where ordinarily she would expect help while finding help in unlikely places.

The biggest problem with the book is that it is bloated. The main reason that it is bloated is the protagonist's ineptitude. And too much snow. How many times do you open a box that has a lid that catches before you decide to figure out why? Me? One! Then the bad guys who the readers are to believe have held sway over the the town are equally inept. If you are searching a car for a fairly thin item, would you go through a box, dump it's contents ignoring the fact that for some reason the lid catches? Not me! I would have torn the thing to pieces. Poor Nora rarely finds a clue on her own. She has nearly every one of them presented with a bow on top, then promptly fails to follow through in any effectual way.

At the beginning the hints and pacing are well handled to create plenty of suspense. However, as the story progresses there are just too many odd angles that never are fully resolved. Red herrings are part of the trade, but eventually their context needs explaining.

The next complaint must be filed under frivolous. This book has too much snow. Long ago I despised reading books set on boats. They made me claustrophobic. I got over it. Then, books set I deserts proved problematic. Mostly over that. Books with insistence on the snow and cold I just do not adore. I suppose we all have our peculiar book turn offs. No doubt you can guess my least favorite of Laura Ingalls Wilder's output. If Milchman could go more than a page without mentioning the temperature or snow it would have helped. The book club discussion on this one will go thusly, "Why didn't you like the book, Lisa?" There is too much snow." Promises to be a brilliant discussion. ( )
  lucybrown | Sep 27, 2015 |
Confronted within minutes with characters named Teggie and Club, and dog named Weekend, I anticipated little joy from Jenny Milchman's first efforts as a mystery novelist. The good news is that it wasn't as bad as I expected, but since I expected it to be abysmal, that isn't saying much. (There are spoilers after this point)

One snowy, bitter cold morning, one were there is a cover of snow and the air is quite frigid, our heroine Nora awakes late to find her husband has committed suicide in the dank, chilly attic she has been remodeling. As she pursues the reason behind his out of character choice, she meets resistance where ordinarily she would expect help while finding help in unlikely places.

The biggest problem with the book is that it is bloated. The main reason that it is bloated is the protagonist's ineptitude. And too much snow. How many times do you open a box that has a lid that catches before you decide to figure out why? Me? One! Then the bad guys who the readers are to believe have held sway over the the town are equally inept. If you are searching a car for a fairly thin item, would you go through a box, dump it's contents ignoring the fact that for some reason the lid catches? Not me! I would have torn the thing to pieces. Poor Nora rarely finds a clue on her own. She has nearly every one of them presented with a bow on top, then promptly fails to follow through in any effectual way.

At the beginning the hints and pacing are well handled to create plenty of suspense. However, as the story progresses there are just too many odd angles that never are fully resolved. Red herrings are part of the trade, but eventually their context needs explaining.

The next complaint must be filed under frivolous. This book has too much snow. Long ago I despised reading books set on boats. They made me claustrophobic. I got over it. Then, books set I deserts proved problematic. Mostly over that. Books with insistence on the snow and cold I just do not adore. I suppose we all have our peculiar book turn offs. No doubt you can guess my least favorite of Laura Ingalls Wilder's output. If Milchman could go more than a page without mentioning the temperature or snow it would have helped. The book club discussion on this one will go thusly, "Why didn't you like the book, Lisa?" There is too much snow." Promises to be a brilliant discussion. ( )
  lucybrown | Sep 27, 2015 |
There is a secret in this town, and it is an old one. A coverup decades old is exposed and the result is tragic. Author Jenny Milchman writes a tale of mystery and suspense with twists along the way that will keep you turning pages. Nora's husband has hanged himself, an act that Nora can't reconcile, and in searching for reasons, discovers corruption in the small town she now calls home. A good read, the story bogs down a bit in the second half and there are still some questions left unanswered. ( )
  Maydacat | Jul 20, 2015 |
Nora wakes one winter morning in Upstate New York to discover her husband (a cop) killed himself. She is in shock, but during her grief she starts to believe that her husband was up to something; he had slipped her some drug that he had acquired two weeks earlier so that she would sleep through that night; he had killed himself on the anniversary of his younger brother's death (which Nora knew nothing about until she starts investigating). This is a amateur sleuth investigating her husband's death to cope with her grief. It's not a bad story, the setting is portrayed very well, but I couldn't help KNOWING that it was going to end happily, which ruined some of the tension. ( )
  minxcr1964 | Jun 11, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 74 (next | show all)
When promo materials say there are deadly secrets buried within Cover of Snow—believe me, they are correct.
 
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This one is for my mother and father,
who in their different ways gave me the gift of story.
And for Josh, who gave me everything.
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My husband wasn't in bed with me when I woke up that January morning.
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Book description
In the wake of her stalwart police officer husband's shattering suicide in their otherwise peaceful Adirondack village, house restorer Nora Hamilton notices strange inconsistencies in her husband's past and in the behaviors of his police force co-workers before stumbling on deadly local secrets.
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In the wake of her stalwart police officer husband's shattering suicide in their otherwise peaceful Adirondack village, house restorer Nora Hamilton notices strange inconsistencies in her husband's past and in the behaviors of his police force co-workers before stumbling on deadly local secrets.… (more)

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