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Matthew Henson: Arctic Adventurer (Graphic…
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Matthew Henson: Arctic Adventurer (Graphic Library: Graphic Biographies) (edition 2005)

by B.A. Hoena, Miller (Illustrator), Charles (Illustrator), Phil (Illustrator), Barnett III (Illustrator)1 more, B. A.

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211495,208 (4)None
rwilliamson's review
This book is part of the Graphic Library biography and history series that is a big hit with my 3rd – 5th grade students. Some students need assistance navigating graphic novels when they first read them. This book Includes a timeline of Henson's life, an Inuit glossary, another glossary, Internet sites, recommended books, an index and a bibliography. The illustrator uses yellow speaking bubbles to indicate direct quotes from primary sources. This is a convention of the series that lends itself to a lesson on primary and secondary sources. The author points out several times that Henson’s life in the Arctic was very different from his life at home. We used this book during Black History Month as an alternative to the usual fare of Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King. I also used it when fifth grade was studying explorers. This book also works well with a more conventional juvenile biography of Henson and Shipwreck At the Bottom of the World to familiarize students with polar exploration. This book while not informative enough for students to use for a report on Henson’s life is a good introduction and a hook for reluctant readers. ( )
  rwilliamson | Apr 28, 2012 |
All member reviews
This book is part of the Graphic Library biography and history series that is a big hit with my 3rd – 5th grade students. Some students need assistance navigating graphic novels when they first read them. This book Includes a timeline of Henson's life, an Inuit glossary, another glossary, Internet sites, recommended books, an index and a bibliography. The illustrator uses yellow speaking bubbles to indicate direct quotes from primary sources. This is a convention of the series that lends itself to a lesson on primary and secondary sources. The author points out several times that Henson’s life in the Arctic was very different from his life at home. We used this book during Black History Month as an alternative to the usual fare of Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King. I also used it when fifth grade was studying explorers. This book also works well with a more conventional juvenile biography of Henson and Shipwreck At the Bottom of the World to familiarize students with polar exploration. This book while not informative enough for students to use for a report on Henson’s life is a good introduction and a hook for reluctant readers. ( )
  rwilliamson | Apr 28, 2012 |

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