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Philosophy of Physics: Space and Time…
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Philosophy of Physics: Space and Time (Princeton Foundations of…

by Tim Maudlin

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A good example of how philosophers talk about and analyze the concepts of space and time advanced by physicists such as Newton and Einstein. Presents an unusually simple basis for special relativity and demonstrates some of the latter's counterintuitive results with spacetime-interval calculations alone. Inexplicably neglects to introduce the standard term "proper time" (whose Wikipedia entry readers might want to look at) for the arc length of worldlines.
  fpagan | Aug 18, 2013 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0691143099, Hardcover)

This concise book introduces nonphysicists to the core philosophical issues surrounding the nature and structure of space and time, and is also an ideal resource for physicists interested in the conceptual foundations of space-time theory.

Tim Maudlin's broad historical overview examines Aristotelian and Newtonian accounts of space and time, and traces how Galileo's conceptions of relativity and space-time led to Einstein's special and general theories of relativity. Maudlin explains special relativity using a geometrical approach, emphasizing intrinsic space-time structure rather than coordinate systems or reference frames. He gives readers enough detail about special relativity to solve concrete physical problems while presenting general relativity in a more qualitative way, with an informative discussion of the geometrization of gravity, the bending of light, and black holes. Additional topics include the Twins Paradox, the physical aspects of the Lorentz-FitzGerald contraction, the constancy of the speed of light, time travel, the direction of time, and more.

Introduces nonphysicists to the philosophical foundations of space-time theory Provides a broad historical overview, from Aristotle to Einstein Explains special relativity geometrically, emphasizing the intrinsic structure of space-time Covers the Twins Paradox, Galilean relativity, time travel, and more Requires only basic algebra and no formal knowledge of physics

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:24:42 -0400)

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