HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Sula by Toni Morrison
Loading...

Sula (original 1973; edition 2004)

by Toni Morrison

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
4,615431,035 (3.79)204
Member:Xzcott
Title:Sula
Authors:Toni Morrison
Info:Vintage (2004), Paperback, 192 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work details

Sula by Toni Morrison (1973)

Recently added bymichael336, Cynfelyn, drpeartree, KamGeb, lorannen, stephaniehong, rosecothren, private library
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 204 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 43 (next | show all)
I haven't read all of Toni Morrison's books, but I have read several, and this was, by far, the best. She honed the prose to a razor sharp edge that cut you to the core. You felt the characters' breath on your face as they lifted out of the book and into your mind and heart. ( )
1 vote vdunn | Apr 30, 2014 |
I first read this book about 20 years ago, but it only gets richer with every reading. This fable-like story takes place in Meridian, Ohio (a fictional town which may be a play on the fact that the first meridian on the 1819 plat maps was in Ohio). The place where the blacks settled in Meridian is called "the bottom" even though it resides in the hills. It is a place of hard scrabble land an no industry from which the inhabitants might find jobs, nor are they allowed to work even decent paying manual labor. Those jobs are always filled by lower class whites, even when they have to be imported from outside the state. All the well fleshed out characters in this book are women, and are comprised of several generations in two families. With the exception of Sula, none are more than minimally educated. Although Sula is the named character, Morrison does not make her the focus until more than half way through and, to me, she was no more interesting than two of the other characters. Sula is very independent, but she's twisted the idea of independence to suit herself and justly suffers by it. Her grandmother, Eva, and her mother, Hannah, both have independence, too, but they employ it in such different fashions, without injuring others.

This book is so rich and the characters are so unusual and fascinating that I fear spoiling the plot for others. All I dare add is that it is book which should be read with reverence for the incredible craft and power of it. ( )
  whymaggiemay | Mar 24, 2014 |
Excellent, surreal and moving. Morrison's prose is elegant and crushing at once, like little bits of glass hidden in your dinner. A moving story about scorn,love and the way the world drifts around us. ( )
  blanderson | Mar 4, 2014 |
High school and collage are students should give this book a chance. ( )
  June_Clark | Feb 16, 2014 |
Sula is the story of two women, Nel and Sula who meet as young girls in the Bottom, a poor African American hillside community above the town of Medallion, Ohio. Growing up together they quickly become friends, sharing good times, laughs and secrets. Although they are best friends, they approach life very differently. Nel grows up in a traditional household and lives her life closely following society’s rules and expectations. She marries right after high school and quickly settles into life as a wife and mother. Sula, who is raised by her one legged grandmother (who somehow gains a fortune at the price of her leg) and loose mother, leaves the Bottom right after Nel’s wedding to go to college. She lives away from the Bottom, never settling down, but having many relationships with various men, including white men. Eventually, she returns to the Bottom and her friendship continues with Nel. However, things happen that strain their relationship and eventually end their friendship.

The story is beautifully narrated by the author. Listening to it definitely makes it feel like a fable or one of those stories passed down generation to generation. There are many parts that looking back on them, don’t quite make sense or seem disconnected, but the narration flows beautifully and it feels like a story that should be told aloud. Interesting themes in this book relating to good vs evil, or how society associates conventional with good and unconventional as evil. ( )
  jmoncton | Feb 2, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 43 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (12 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Toni Morrisonprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Dorsman-Vos, W.A.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vink, NettieTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wood, OwenCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Information from the Finnish Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to the English one.
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
'Nobody knew my rose of the world but me.... I had too much glory. They don't want glory like that in nobody's heart."

- The Rose Tattoo
Dedication
It is sheer good fortune to miss someone long before they leave you. This book is for Ford and Slade, whom I miss although they have not left me.
First words
In that place, where they tore the nightshade and blackberry patches from the roots to make room for the Medallion City Golf Course, there was once a neighborhood.
Quotations
the only way to avoid the Hand of God is to get in it
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (3)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0452263492, Paperback)

Book Description Publication Date: 1982 | Series: Plume Amazon.com Review: In Sula, Toni Morrison, winner of the 1993 Nobel Prize for literature, tells the story of two women--friends since childhood, separated in young adulthood, and reunited as grown women. Nel Wright grows up to become a wife and mother, happy to remain in her hometown of Medallion, Ohio. Sula Peace leaves Medallion to experience college, men, and life in the big city, an exceptional choice for a black woman to make in the late 1920s. As girls, Nel and Sula are the best of friends, only children who find in each other a kindred spirit to share in each girl's loneliness and imagination. When they meet again as adults, it's clear that Nel has chosen a life of acceptance and accommodation, while Sula must fight to defend her seemingly unconventional choices and beliefs. But regardless of the physical and emotional distance that threatens this extraordinary friendship, the bond between the women remains unbreakable: "Her old friend had come home.... Sula, whose past she had lived through and with whom the present was a constant sharing of perceptions. Talking to Sula had always been a conversation with herself." Lyrical and gripping, Sula is an honest look at the power of friendship amid a backdrop of family, love, race, and the human condition. --Gisele Toueg

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:45:35 -0400)

(see all 6 descriptions)

Traces the lives of two African American women from their youth in small-town Georgia, through divergent paths of womanhood, to their ultimate confrontation and reconciliation.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 5 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
481 avail.
102 wanted
5 pay2 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.79)
0.5
1 20
1.5 8
2 47
2.5 17
3 210
3.5 42
4 311
4.5 32
5 222

Audible.com

An edition of this book was published by Audible.com.

See editions

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 92,961,519 books! | Top bar: Always visible